William W. Abbott

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Eye movements are highly correlated with motor intentions and are often retained by patients with serious motor deficiencies. Despite this, eye tracking is not widely used as control interface for movement in impaired patients due to poor signal interpretation and lack of control flexibility. We propose that tracking the gaze position in 3D rather than 2D(More)
Advancement in Brain machine interfaces (BMIs) holds the hope to restore vital degrees of independence for patients with high-level neurological disorders, improving their quality of life while reducing their dependency on others [1]. Unfortunately these emerging rehabilitative methods come at considerable clinical and postclinical operational costs, beyond(More)
Eye movements are closely related to motor actions, and hence can be used to infer motor intentions. Additionally, eye movements are in some cases the only means of communication and interaction with the environment for paralysed and impaired patients with severe motor deficiencies. Despite this, eye-tracking technology still has a very limited use as a(More)
Eye tracking is a powerful mean for assistive technologies for people with movement disorders, paralysis and amputees. We present a highly intuitive eye tracking-controlled robot arm operating in 3-dimensional space based on the user's gaze target point that enables tele-writing and drawing. The usability and intuitive usage was assessed by a(More)
Eye movements are highly correlated with motor intentions and are often retained by patients with serious motor deficiencies. Despite this, eye tracking is not widely used as control interface for movement impaired patients due to poor signal interpretation and lack of control flexibility. We propose that tracking the gaze position in 3D rather than 2D(More)
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