William R. Hamburgen

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T he advent of fast, power-thrifty microprocessors has made possible pocket-size computers with performance approaching that of desktop PCs. This new class of mobile computers enables applications and user-interface modalities not feasible with traditional personal digital assistants and cell phones, while placing new demands on batteries and power(More)
The Itsy pocket computer is a flexible research platform developed at Compaq Computer Corporation’s Western Research Laboratory (WRL). The goal of this project is to enable hardware and software research in handheld computing. Several versions of the Itsy system were designed and built. This document evaluates the power consumption of Itsy version 2.3.
Several previous studies have been performed which evaluate the power consumption of the Itsy pocket computer version 2, developed at Compaq Computer Corporation’s Western Research Laboratory (WRL). Attempts have been made by others to use the data from these studies to characterize the behavior of the Lithium-ion battery used for the Itsy. Although our(More)
In a multi-board computer system, the volume allocated for heat removal is often a significant fraction of the total system volume. Cooling requirements can thus impact performance, reliability, cost, acoustic noise, and floorspace. This work addresses the volume costs or space requirements for removing heat with optimally designed finned heat sinks. Simple(More)
The Itsy pocket computer is a flexible research platform developed at Compaq Computer Corporation’s Western Research Laboratory (WRL). The goal of this project is to enable hardware and software research in handheld computing. Several versions of the Itsy system were designed and built. This document evaluates the power consumption of Itsy version 2.4. A(More)
The Itsy pocket computer is a powerful information device small enough to be comfortably worn or carried. It was created to support research in user interfaces and applications. A 32-bit, 200MHz microprocessor and 32 MB each of flash memory and DRAM made it the first small handheld able to run traditional desktop applications such as continuous speech(More)
Many electronic assembly processes require dispensing small dots of heavily filled materials such as solder paste and loaded epoxies. Methods were developed for rapidly optimizing processes that control the size and shape of such dots. The approach was to separate the process of making a known quantity of material appear at the dispense tip from the process(More)
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