William L. Wascher

Learn More
We review the burgeoning literature on the employment effects of minimum wages – in the United States and in other countries – that was spurred by the new minimum wage research beginning in the early 1990s. Our review indicates that there is a wide range of existing estimates and, accordingly, a lack of consensus about the overall effects on low-wage(More)
This paper provides the first application of the compensating differential paradigm to the evaluation of the extent and sources of evolution in state quality-of-life. The compensating differentials approach derives from early work by Rosen (1979) and Roback (1982), who showed how to extract quality-of-life measures from compensating differentials in wages(More)
Revisiting the Minimum Wage-Employment Debate: Throwing Out the Baby with the Bathwater? We revisit the minimum wage-employment debate, which is as old as the Department of Labor. In particular, we assess new studies claiming that the standard panel data approach used in much of the “new minimum wage research” is flawed because it fails to account for(More)
This paper provides the first application of the compensating differential paradigm to the evaluation of the extent and sources of evolution in quality-of-life among U.S. states. In addition to providing estimates of quality-of-life rankings for U.S. states over the 19811990 period, we use estimated implicit prices on place-specific amenities to calculate(More)
"This paper examines the determinants of regional migration [in the United States] in the 1980s using a place-to-place migration model in which migration flows depend upon the relative economic opportunities in the origin and destination regions. Using the results of the model, we then examine the potential role for migration in diffusing the economic(More)
An important and surprising characteristic of the economies in industrialised countries in the 1990s was the extent to which prices decelerated in an environment of generally rising economic activity and tightening labour markets. The coexistence of a healthy economic environment and low inflation can appropriately be described as good news. However,(More)