William J. Broughton

Learn More
1. The finding that the plant is the genetic determinant of leghaemoglobin production in legume nodules was further tested by inoculating snake beans with two strains of Rhizobium selected to give large genetic differences. Carbohydrate requirement patterns, immunological techniques and DNA base ratio determinations were used to demonstrate genetic(More)
Globally, 800 million people are malnourished. Heavily subsidised farmers in rich countries produce sufficient surplus food to feed the hungry, but not at a price the poor can afford. Even donating the rich world's surplus to the poor would not solve the problem. Most poor people earn their living from agriculture, so a deluge of free food would destroy(More)
Eukaryotes often form symbioses with microorganisms. Among these, associations between plants and nitrogen-fixing bacteria are responsible for the nitrogen input into various ecological niches. Plants of many different families have evolved the capacity to develop root or stem nodules with diverse genera of soil bacteria. Of these, symbioses between legumes(More)
Access to mineral nitrogen often limits plant growth, and so symbiotic relationships have evolved between plants and a variety of nitrogen-fixing organisms. These associations are responsible for reducing 120 million tonnes of atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia each year. In agriculture, independence from nitrogenous fertilizers expands crop production and(More)
Genetically, Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 and R. fredii USDA257 are closely related. Small differences in their nodulation genes result in NGR234 secreting larger amounts of more diverse lipo-oligosaccharidic Nod factors than USDA257. What effects these differences have on nodulation were analyzed by inoculating 452 species of legumes, representing all three(More)
Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 is a unique alphaproteobacterium (order Rhizobiales) that forms nitrogen-fixing nodules with more legumes than any other microsymbiont. We report here that the 3.93-Mbp chromosome (cNGR234) encodes most functions required for cellular growth. Few essential functions are encoded on the 2.43-Mbp megaplasmid (pNGR234b), and none are(More)
The symbiotic plasmid of Rhizobium sp. NGR234 carries a cluster of genes that encodes components of a bacterial type III secretion system (TTSS). In both animal and plant pathogens, the TTSS is an essential component of pathogenicity. Here, we show that secretion of at least two proteins (y4xL and NolX) is controlled by the TTSS of NGR234 and occurs after(More)
Mutagenesis and sequence analyses of rhizobial genomes have revealed the presence of genes encoding type III secretion systems. Considered as a machine used by plant and animal pathogens to deliver virulence factors into their hosts, this secretion apparatus has recently been proven to play a role in symbiotic bacteria-leguminous plant interactions.
Rhizobia — a diverse group of soil bacteria — induce the formation of nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots of legumes. Nodulation begins when the roots initiate a molecular dialogue with compatible rhizobia in the soil. Most rhizobia reply by secreting lipochitooligosaccharidic nodulation factors that enable entry into the legume. A molecular exchange(More)
Flavonoids secreted by host plants activate, in conjunction with the transcriptional activator NodD, nod gene expression of rhizobia resulting in the synthesis of Nod factors, which trigger nodule organogenesis. Interestingly, addition of inducing flavonoids also stimulates the production of the phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in several rhizobia.(More)