William H. Romme

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Future drought is projected to occur under warmer temperature conditions as climate change progresses, referred to here as global-change-type drought, yet quantitative assessments of the triggers and potential extent of drought-induced vegetation die-off remain pivotal uncertainties in assessing climate-change impacts. Of particular concern is(More)
Climate change is likely to alter wildfire regimes, but the magnitude and timing of potential climate-driven changes in regional fire regimes are not well understood. We considered how the occurrence, size, and spatial location of large fires might respond to climate projections in the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem (GYE) (Wyoming), a large wildland(More)
Temporal and spatial scales of disturbance and recovery are often confounded in discussions of landscape equilibrium. We developed a broad framework for the description of landscapes that separates the spatial and temporal scales of disturbance and recovery and predicts the resultant dynamics of a landscape. Two key parameters representing time and space(More)
Crown fires create broad-scale patterns in vegetation by producing a patch mosaic of stand age classes, but the spread and behavior of crown fires also may be constrained by spatial patterns in terrain and fuels across the landscape. In this review, we address the implications of landscape heterogeneity for crown fire behavior and the ecological effects of(More)
The 1988 Yellowstone fires resulted in a complex mosaic within which postfire lodgepole pine seedling densities varied by over five orders of magnitude. Investigators have speculated that such postfire mosaics of vegetation structure may persist until the next large disturbance, but the fate of the initial structural variability of postfire communities is(More)
Causes and implications of spatial variability in postfire tree density and understory plant cover for patterns of aboveground net primary production (ANPP) and leaf area index (LAI) were examined in ninety 11-year-old lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia Engelm.) stands across the landscape of Yellowstone National Park (YNP), Wyoming, USA. Field(More)
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The time interval between stand-replacing fires can influence patterns of initial postfire succession if the abundance of postfire propagules varies with prefire stand age. We examined the effect of fire interval on initial postfire lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia Engelm.) density in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) following the 1988 fires. We(More)
Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use, available at http://www.jstor.org/about/terms.html. JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use provides, in part, that unless you have obtained prior permission, you may not download an entire issue of a journal or multiple copies of articles, and you may use content in(More)