William E. Fleenor

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High variability in environmental conditions in both space and time once made the upper San Francisco Estuary (the Estuary) highly productive for native biota. Present conditions often discourage native species, providing a rationale for restoring estuarine variability and habitat complexity. Achieving a variable, more complex Estuary requires policies(More)
Several methods for developing flow prescriptions to support desirable fish species in the Delta are compared. To be useful, flow prescriptions must respond to the changing characteristics of the Delta, including sea level rise, additional flooded islands, changes in water diversions, and new invasive species. Adaptive flow prescriptions for desirable fish(More)
Management of the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta is one of California's greatest challenges, because the lands and water resources of the system serve a multiplicity of conflicting purposes. The native wetlands of the estuary have been dredged and diked to support farming, transportation, commerce, and housing development. Diversions from the Delta watershed(More)
The native fishes of the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta have been declining at an increasingly rapid rate for more than two decades. This decline has significant consequences for water resource management in the Delta, particularly for operations of the State Water Project (SWP) and the federal Central Valley Project (CVP). There is no single cause for the(More)
The San Francisco Estuary is a young estuary, about 6-10,000 years old in its present location. It became established during periods of high climatic variability (reflected in extreme floods and long droughts) compared to the relatively stable past 150 years. The Delta was formed as a huge freshwater marsh through the interaction of river inflow and the(More)
Reversing declines in the populations of native fish in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta is a major water policy challenge for California. In choosing a portfolio of management actions to improve conditions for these fish, two considerations are key: the actions' ecological potential to support these species and the costs to those using the Delta's lands(More)
A century and a half of human uses of the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta and its greater watershed have transformed the aquatic ecosystem, sharply reducing native fish populations. Efforts to reverse these declines have been largely unsuccessful, and the rising costs of regulation have fueled social conflicts. These conflicts have often played out in the(More)
The Public Policy Institute of California is dedicated to informing and improving public policy in California through independent, objective, nonpartisan research on major economic, social, and political issues. The institute's goal is to raise public awareness and to give elected representatives and other decisionmakers a more informed basis for developing(More)
The Public Policy Institute of California is dedicated to informing and improving public policy in California through independent, objective, nonpartisan research on major economic, social, and political issues. The institute's goal is to raise public awareness and to give elected representatives and other decisionmakers a more informed basis for developing(More)