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Despite its central role in human cancer, MYC deregulation is insufficient by itself to transform cells. Because inherent mechanisms of neoplastic control prevent precancerous lesions from becoming fully malignant, identifying transforming alleles of MYC that bypass such controls may provide fundamental insights into tumorigenesis. To date, the only(More)
MYC is a key driver of cellular transformation and is deregulated in most human cancers. Studies of MYC and its interactors have provided mechanistic insight into its role as a regulator of gene transcription. MYC has been previously linked to chromatin regulation through its interaction with INI1 (SMARCB1/hSNF5/BAF47), a core member of the SWI/SNF(More)
A cell’s epigenome arises from interactions among regulatory factors—transcription factors and histone modifications—co-localized at particular genomic regions. We developed a novel statistical method, ChromNet, to infer a network of these interactions, the chromatin network, by inferring conditional-dependence relationships among a large number of ChIP-seq(More)
Despite its central role in human cancer, MYC deregulation is insufficient by itself to transform cells. Because inherent mechanisms of neoplastic control prevent precancerous lesions from becoming fully malignant, identifying transforming alleles of MYC that bypass such controls may provide fundamental insights into tumorigenesis. To date, the only(More)
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