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  • Dani K. Raap, Francisca Abad García, Nancy A. Muma, William A. Wolf, Giuseppe Battaglia, Louis D. van de Kar
  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • The Journal of pharmacology and experimental…
  • 1999 (First Publication: 1 February 1999)
  • Long-term exposure to fluoxetine produces a desensitization of hypothalamic postsynaptic 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)1A receptors, indicated by a substantial inhibition of the 5-HT1A receptor-mediatedContinue Reading
  • William A. Wolf, Gerald J. Bieganski, Veronica Guillen, Laurence Mignon
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Psychopharmacology
  • 2005 (First Publication: 1 October 2005)
  • RationaleHaloperidol is a representative of typical antipsychotics that are still in clinical use and which can lead to abnormal motor activity following repeated administration. The mechanismsContinue Reading
  • Dani K. Raap, Suzanne Evans, +5 authors Louis D. van de Kar
  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • The Journal of pharmacology and experimental…
  • 1999
  • The present studies examined the dose-response relationship of fluoxetine-induced desensitization of hypothalamic postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptors, as measured from the reduced neuroendocrine responsesContinue Reading
  • William A. Wolf, Leonard Schutz
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Journal of neurochemistry
  • 1997 (First Publication: 18 November 2002)
  • Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors belong to the class of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC)-linked receptors. Conditions were established for measuringContinue Reading
  • Erik J. Beltran, Catherine M Papadopoulos, Shih-Yen Tsai, Gwendolyn L. Kartje, William A. Wolf
  • Medicine
  • Brain Research
  • 2010 (First Publication: 1 July 2010)
  • Drugs that increase central noradrenergic activity have been shown to enhance the rate of recovery of motor function in pre-clinical models of brain damage. Less is known about whether noradrenergicContinue Reading