Wiep Scheper

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Accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum triggers a cellular stress response called the unfolded protein response (UPR) that protects the cell against the toxic buildup of misfolded proteins. Previously, we reported that UPR activation is increased in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. How the UPR relates to the pathological hallmarks(More)
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is, at the neuropathological level, characterized by the accumulation and aggregation of misfolded proteins. The presence of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) triggers a cellular stress response called the unfolded protein response (UPR) that may protect the cell against the toxic buildup of misfolded proteins. In(More)
Protein folding stress in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) may lead to activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), aimed to restore cellular homeostasis via transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. ER stress is also reported to activate the ER overload response (EOR), which activates transcription via NF-κB. We previously demonstrated that(More)
The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a stress response activated upon disturbed homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Previously, we reported that the activation of the UPR closely correlates with the presence of phosphorylated tau (p-tau) in Alzheimer's disease (AD). As well as increased presence of intracellular p-tau, AD brains are(More)
Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 2 (PCH-2; MIM 277470), an autosomal recessive neurodegeneration with fetal onset, was studied in six autopsies with ages at death ranging between 1 and 22 years. Three patients were distantly related. A case of olivopontocerebellar hypoplasia (OPCH; MIM 225753) was studied for comparison. Typical findings are: short(More)
The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a stress response of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to a disturbance in protein folding. The so-called ER stress sensors PERK, IRE1 and ATF6 play a central role in the initiation and regulation of the UPR. The accumulation of misfolded and aggregated proteins is a common characteristic of neurodegenerative diseases.(More)
The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is involved in the folding and maturation of membrane-bound and secreted proteins. Disturbed homeostasis in the ER can lead to accumulation of misfolded proteins, which trigger a stress response called the unfolded protein response (UPR). In neurodegenerative diseases that are classified as tauopathies, activation of the UPR(More)
Neurodegenerative disorders are often characterized by the aggregation and accumulation of misfolded proteins (e.g. Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis). Aggregated proteins are very toxic to cells in culture and both in vitro and in vivo there is overwhelming evidence that these aberrant proteins are key players in(More)
A common characteristic of neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD) is the accumulation of protein aggregates. This reflects a severe disturbance of protein homeostasis, the proteostasis. Here, we review the involvement of the two major proteolytic machineries, the ubiquitin proteasome(More)
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the aggregation and subsequent deposition of misfolded beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptide. Previous studies show that aggregated Abeta is more toxic in oligomeric than in fibrillar form, and that each aggregation form activates specific molecular pathways in the cell. We hypothesize that these differences between(More)