Wes Maciejewski

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Evolutionary graph theory is a well established framework for modelling the evolution of social behaviours in structured populations. An emerging consensus in this field is that graphs that exhibit heterogeneity in the number of connections between individuals are more conducive to the spread of cooperative behaviours. In this article we show that such a(More)
We study the evolution of a pair of competing behavioural alleles in a structured population when there are non-additive or 'synergistic' fitness effects. Under a form of weak selection and with a simple symmetry condition between a pair of competing alleles, Tarnita et al. provide a surprisingly simple condition for one allele to dominate the other. Their(More)
Evolutionary graph theory has grown to be an area of intense study. Despite the amount of interest in the field, it seems to have grown separate from other subfields of population genetics and evolution. In the current work I introduce the concept of Fisher's (1930) reproductive value into the study of evolution on graphs. Reproductive value is a measure of(More)
Understanding the influence of an environment on the evolution of its resident population is a major challenge in evolutionary biology. Great progress has been made in homogeneous population structures while heterogeneous structures have received relatively less attention. Here we present a structured population model where different individuals are best(More)
Specific activities performed by STLF 1) Professional Development. • The department math education reading group is well underway. I've led discussions on two papers so far and I'm encouraging submissions from other members of the group. 2) Department meetings/activity • Met with Sandra on 08/09/2013 to discuss my initial duties as an STLF. 3)(More)
here right-hand corner of the article or click Receive free email alerts when new articles cite this article-sign up in the box at the top When investigating evolution in structured populations, it is often convenient to consider the population as an evolutionary graph—individuals as nodes, and whom they may act with as edges. There has, in recent years,(More)
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