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As a first step toward understanding how rare variants contribute to risk for complex diseases, we sequenced 15,585 human protein-coding genes to an average median depth of 111× in 2440 individuals of European (n = 1351) and African (n = 1088) ancestry. We identified over 500,000 single-nucleotide variants (SNVs), the majority of which were rare (86% with a(More)
Establishing the age of each mutation segregating in contemporary human populations is important to fully understand our evolutionary history and will help to facilitate the development of new approaches for disease-gene discovery. Large-scale surveys of human genetic variation have reported signatures of recent explosive population growth, notable for an(More)
Exome sequencing studies of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have identified many de novo mutations but few recurrently disrupted genes. We therefore developed a modified molecular inversion probe method enabling ultra-low-cost candidate gene resequencing in very large cohorts. To demonstrate the power of this approach, we captured and sequenced 44(More)
To reconstruct modern human evolutionary history and identify loci that have shaped hunter-gatherer adaptation, we sequenced the whole genomes of five individuals in each of three different hunter-gatherer populations at > 60× coverage: Pygmies from Cameroon and Khoesan-speaking Hadza and Sandawe from Tanzania. We identify 13.4 million variants,(More)
To date, most genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and studies of fine-scale population structure have been conducted primarily on Europeans. Han Chinese, the largest ethnic group in the world, composing 20% of the entire global human population, is largely underrepresented in such studies. A well-recognized challenge is the fact that population structure(More)
Whole-genome and exome data sets continue to be produced at a frenetic pace, resulting in massively large catalogs of human genomic variation. However, a clear picture of the characteristics and patterns of neutral and deleterious variation within and between populations has yet to emerge, given that recent large-scale sequencing studies have often(More)
Genomes contain both a genetic code specifying amino acids and a regulatory code specifying transcription factor (TF) recognition sequences. We used genomic deoxyribonuclease I footprinting to map nucleotide resolution TF occupancy across the human exome in 81 diverse cell types. We found that ~15% of human codons are dual-use codons ("duons") that(More)
Copy number variants (CNVs) in the human genome contribute to both Mendelian and complex traits as well as to genomic plasticity in evolution. The investigation of mutational rates of CNVs is critical to understanding genomic instability and the etiology of the copy number variation (CNV)-related traits. However, the evaluation of the CNV mutation rate at(More)
An enduring goal of evolutionary biology is to understand how natural selection has shaped patterns of polymorphism and divergence within and between species and to map the genetic basis of adaptations. The rapid maturation of next-generation sequencing technology has generated a deluge of genomics data from nonhuman primates, extinct hominins, and diverse(More)
The advent of high-throughput and cost-effective genotyping platforms made genome-wide association (GWA) studies a reality. While the primary focus has been invested upon the improvement of reducing genotyping error, the problems associated with missing calls are largely overlooked. To probe into the effect of missing calls on GWAs, we demonstrated(More)