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W3C published the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0 (WCAG 1.0) as a Recommendation in May 1999. This Working Draft for version 2.0 builds on WCAG 1.0. It has the same aim: explain how to make Web content accessible to people with disabilities. Incorporating feedback on WCAG 1.0, this Working Draft of version 2.0 focuses on checkpoints. It attempts to(More)
These guidelines explain how to make Web content [p. 26] accessible to people with disabilities. The guidelines are intended for all Web content developers [p. 26] (page authors and site designers) and for developers of authoring tools [p. 25]. The primary goal of these guidelines is to promote accessibility. However, following them will also make Web(More)
Subjective transverse chromatic aberration (sTCA) manifest at the fovea was determined for a population of 85 young adults (19-38 years old) by means of a two-dimensional, two-color, vernier alignment technique. The statistical distribution of sTCA was well fitted by a bivariate Gaussian function with mean values that were not significantly different from(More)
In this paper we describe recent developments and our experiences in releasing WebAnywhere. WebAnywhere was originally designed as a web-based alternative to a traditional screen reader. It can be run on any computer without installing new software, making it ideal for use on-the-go or in libraries and schools where the appropriate access technology is(More)
These guidelines explain how to make Web content [p. 26] accessible to people with disabilities. The guidelines are intended for all Web content developers [p. 26] (page authors and site designers) and for developers of authoring tools [p. 25]. The primary goal of these guidelines is to promote accessibility. However, following them will also make Web(More)