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Tissue progenitor cells are an attractive target for regenerative therapy. In various organs, bone marrow cell (BMC) therapy has shown promising preliminary results, but to date no definite mechanism has been demonstrated to account for the observed benefit in organ regeneration. Tissue injury and regeneration is invariably accompanied by macrophage(More)
Hepatocytes and cholangiocytes self-renew following liver injury. Following severe injury hepatocytes are increasingly senescent, but whether hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) then contribute to liver regeneration is unclear. Here, we describe a mouse model where the E3 ubiquitin ligase Mdm2 is inducibly deleted in more than 98% of hepatocytes, causing(More)
The liver is a complex organ that requires multiple rounds of cell fate decision for development and homeostasis throughout the lifetime. During the earliest phases of organogenesis, the liver acquires a separate lineage from the pancreas and the intestine, and subsequently, the liver bud must appropriately differentiate to form metabolic hepatocytes and(More)
UNLABELLED In severe liver injury, ductular reactions (DRs) containing bipotential hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) branch from the portal tract. Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) marks bile ducts and DRs, but not mature hepatocytes. NCAM mediates interactions between cells and surrounding matrix; however, its role in liver development and regeneration is(More)
OBJECTIVE Following chronic liver injury or when hepatocyte proliferation is impaired, ductular reactions containing hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) appear in the periportal regions and can regenerate the liver parenchyma. HPCs exist in a niche composed of myofibroblasts, macrophages and laminin matrix. Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is a β-galactoside-binding lectin(More)
Fibroproliferative diseases are driven by dysregulated tissue repair responses and are a major cause of morbidity and mortality because they affect nearly every organ system. Type 2 cytokine responses are critically involved in tissue repair; however, the mechanisms that regulate beneficial regeneration versus pathological fibrosis are not well understood.(More)
After liver injury, regeneration occurs through self-replication of hepatocytes. In severe liver injury, hepatocyte proliferation is impaired-a feature of human chronic liver disease. It is unclear whether other liver cell types can regenerate hepatocytes. Here we use two independent systems to impair hepatocyte proliferation during liver injury to evaluate(More)
The prognosis of cholangiocarcinoma (CC) is dismal. Notch has been identified as a potential driver; forced exogenous overexpression of Notch1 in hepatocytes results in the formation of biliary tumors. In human disease, however, it is unknown which components of the endogenously signaling pathway are required for tumorigenesis, how these orchestrate cancer,(More)
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