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In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, glycogen is accumulated as a carbohydrate reserve when cells are deprived of nutrients. Yeast mutated in SNF1, a gene encoding a protein kinase required for glucose derepression, has diminished glycogen accumulation and concomitant inactivation of glycogen synthase. Restoration of synthesis in an snf1 strain results(More)
BACKGROUND Genetic studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have shown that Snf1p and Snf4p, which together form the SNF1 complex, are essential for gene derepression on removal of glucose from the medium. However the metabolic signal(s) involved, and the exact role of SNF1, have remained enigmatic. Recently, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was shown to(More)
In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, PHO85 encodes a cyclin-dependent protein kinase (Cdk) with multiple roles in cell cycle and metabolic controls. In association with the cyclin Pho80, Pho85 controls acid phosphatase gene expression through phosphorylation of the transcription factor Pho4. Pho85 has also been implicated as a kinase that phosphorylates and(More)
At the onset of nutrient limitation, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae synthesizes glycogen to serve as a carbon and energy reserve. We undertook a systematic survey for the genes that affect glycogen accumulation by taking advantage of the strain deletion set generated by the Saccharomyces Genome Deletion Project. The strain collection analyzed contained(More)
Trichomonas vaginalis, a flagellated protozoan, is the agent responsible for trichomoniasis, the most common nonviral sexually transmitted infection worldwide. A reported 200 million cases are documented each year with far more cases going unreported. However, T. vaginalis is disproportionality under studied, especially considering its basic metabolism. It(More)
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