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OBJECTIVE To test the ability of a computer-based interview to detect factors related to the risk of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among potential blood donors and to determine donor reactions to the use of the interview. DESIGN A comparison of the rate of detection of HIV-related factors elicited by a computer interview with that obtained by(More)
We designed a user-friendly computer program that permits physicians to use clinical and demographic descriptors to search a hospital's clinical database for purposes of patient care, teaching, and research. For example, the user can identify all admissions in which diabetic ketoacidosis was diagnosed, the serum bicarbonate level was under 12 mmol/liter,(More)
To evaluate the confidentiality of the patients' data in the electronic patient records designed by members of the Center for Clinical Computing in Boston, we examined the accessibility of the computer-stored medical records of two groups of patients at Boston's Beth Israel Hospital: celebrities, hospital employees, and their relatives (VIPs) and other(More)
PURPOSE Our purpose is to counter the common wisdom that doctors are refractory to change and therefore responsible for the limited use of electronic medical records. METHODS We draw on experience with electronic medical records in two Harvard Medical School teaching hospitals dating back to the early 1980s. RESULTS Doctors quickly become ardent users(More)
Even the most extensive hospital information system cannot support all the complex and ever-changing demands associated with a clinical database, such as providing department or personal data forms, and rating scales. Well-designed clinical dialogue programs may facilitate direct interaction of patients with their medical records. Incorporation of extensive(More)
Computers are steadily being incorporated in clinical practice. We conducted a nonrandomised, controlled, prospective trial of electronic messages designed to enhance adherence to clinical practice guidelines. We studied 126 physicians and nurse practitioners who used electronic medical records when caring for 349 patients with HIV infection in a primary(More)
BACKGROUND Hospital computing systems play an important part in the communication of clinical information to physicians. We sought to determine whether computer-based alerts for hospitalized patients can affect physicians' behavior and improve patients' outcomes. METHODS We performed a prospective time-series study to determine whether computerized alerts(More)
Computing systems developed by the Center for Clinical Computing (CCC) have been in operation in Beth Israel and Brigham and Women's hospitals for over 10 years. Designed to be of direct benefit to doctors, nurses, and other clinicians in the care of their patients, the CCC systems give the results of diagnostic studies immediately upon request; offer(More)