Wanchai Rattanadechakul

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Maternally inherited rickettsial symbionts of the genus Wolbachia occur commonly in arthropods, often behaving as reproductive parasites by manipulating host reproduction to enhance the vertical transmission of infections. One manipulation is cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI), which causes a significant reduction in brood hatch and promotes the spread of the(More)
Wolbachia are obligate, maternally inherited, intracellular bacteria that infect numerous insects and other invertebrates. Wolbachia infections have evolved multiple mechanisms to manipulate host reproduction and facilitate invasion of naive host populations. One such mechanism is cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) that occurs in many insect species,(More)
Intracellular bacteria of the genus Wolbachia often behave as reproductive parasites by manipulating host reproduction to enhance the vertical transmission of infections. Wolbachia infections in Aedes albopictus (Skuse) cause a reproductive manipulation known as cytoplasmic incompatibility, which can reduce brood hatch. Because field populations of Ae.(More)
Maternally inherited bacteria of the genus Volbachia can cause cytoplasmic incompatibility resulting in the developmental arrest of early embryos. Previous studies have shown that both single- and superinfections of Wolbachia naturally occur in populations of Aedes albopictus (Skuse). Here, we report crossing experiments using three infection types(More)
A reproductive advantage afforded to female hosts by obligate intracellular Wolbachia infections can result in the spread of the vertically-inherited bacteria into the host population, replacing the uninfected cytotype (population replacement). Here we examine Wolbachia infection dynamics relevant to the origin of Wolbachia superinfection (i.e., host(More)
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