Wallace J Brownlee

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The McDonald criteria allow multiple sclerosis (MS) to be diagnosed in patients with a clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) who have MRI evidence of dissemination in time and space. 1–3 There have been successive versions of the criteria in 2001, 1 2005 2 and 2010 3 with different requirements for dissemination in time and space. Although each version has(More)
The diagnosis of multiple sclerosis is based on neurological symptoms and signs, alongside evidence of dissemination of CNS lesions in space and time. MRI is often sufficient to confirm the diagnosis when characteristic lesions accompany a typical clinical syndrome, but in some patients, further supportive information is obtained from cerebrospinal fluid(More)
The most common presentation of multiple sclerosis (MS) is with a clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) affecting the optic nerves, brainstem or spinal cord. Two thirds of patients with CIS will have further episodes of neurological dysfunction and convert to relapsing-remitting MS, while the remaining patients have a monophasic illness, at least clinically.(More)
Exogenous androgenic steroids applied to pregnant sheep programmes a PCOS-like phenotype in female offspring. Via ultrasound guidance we applied steroids directly to ovine fetuses at d62 and d82 of gestation, and examined fetal (day 90 gestation) and postnatal (11 months old) pancreatic structure and function. Of three classes of steroid agonists applied(More)
OBJECTIVES To investigate whether inclusion of lesions in the symptomatic region influences the performance of dissemination in space (DIS) criteria for a diagnosis of clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS) in patients with a clinically isolated syndrome (CIS). METHODS We studied 30 patients with CIS with brainstem/cerebellar and spinal cord(More)
Past generations of neurologists frequently took the approach of 'diagnose and adios' to managing patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). It is now generally accepted that MS is a chronic but treatable illness that requires long-term care from a neurologist. A recent study examining healthcare utilization in the United States found that although routine(More)
Bleeding is the most important complication of treatment with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke. Neurologists are familiar with intracranial hemorrhage, the most feared site for bleeding following thrombolysis, but extracranial bleeding can also occur resulting in substantial morbidity and mortality. We describe an(More)