• Publications
  • Influence
Extinction risk and conservation of the world’s sharks and rays
TLDR
Overall chondrichthyan extinction risk is substantially higher for sharks, rays, and chimaeras than for most other vertebrates, and only one-third of species are considered safe.
A DNA Sequence–Based Approach To the Identification of Shark and Ray Species and Its Implications for Global Elasmobranch Diversity and Parasitology
TLDR
A comprehensive survey of DNA sequences derived from the mitochondrial NADH2 gene was conducted for elasmobranchs collected from around the world, suggesting 79 potentially new taxa that are genetically distinct from their closest relatives in other regions.
DNA barcoding Australasian chondrichthyans: results and potential uses in conservation
TLDR
It is concluded that cox1 barcoding can be used to identify shark and ray species with a very high degree of accuracy and also highlights some taxonomic issues that need to be investigated further.
The importance of research and public opinion to conservation management of sharks and rays: a synthesis
TLDR
The present paper examines the growing need for research for conservation management of sharks and rays by synthesising information presented in this Special Issue from the 2010 Sharks International Conference and by identifying future research needs, including topics such as taxonomy, life history, population status, spatial ecology, environmental effects and human impacts.
Long‐term shifts in abundance and distribution of a temperate fish fauna: a response to climate change and fishing practices
TLDR
Some of the region’s largest predatory reef fishes have become extinct in Tasmanian seas since the‘late 1800s’, most likely as a result of poorfishing practices, and this work attempts to resolve the agents of change by examining major temporal and distributional shifts in the fish fauna.
Catch composition and reproductive biology of whaler sharks (Carcharhiniformes: Carcharhinidae) caught by fisheries in Indonesia
  • W. White
  • Environmental Science
  • 1 November 2007
TLDR
A number of species, most notably Carcharhinus sorrah and Loxodon macrorhinus, were found to differ from those recorded in the literature for other regions.
Comparisons between the diets of four abundant species of elasmobranchs in a subtropical embayment: implications for resource partitioning
TLDR
The diets of one ray species and three shark species undergo size-related changes and differ among these species in the nearshore waters of a large subtropical embayment (Shark Bay) in which these elasmobranchs are abundant, thereby reducing the potential for competition for food within and among these four species.
Habitat partitioning among four elasmobranch species in nearshore, shallow waters of a subtropical embayment in Western Australia
TLDR
It is concluded that the spatial and food resources in the nearshore, shallow waters of Shark Bay are partitioned among elasmobranch species, thus reducing the potential for competition among these species for the resources in those waters.
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