• Publications
  • Influence
Development of a Spatial Analysis Method Using Ground-Based Repeat Photography to Detect Changes in the Alpine Treeline Ecotone, Glacier National Park, Montana, U.S.A
ABSTRACT Repeat photography is a powerful tool for detection of landscape change over decadal timescales. Here a novel method is presented that applies spatial analysis software to digitalExpand
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Fly Development Work Bears Prize-Winning Fruit
This year's Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine went to three researchers who unraveled thegenetics of Drosophila development: Edward B. Lewis, Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard, and Eric Wieschaus
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Nobel prizes: fly development work bears prize-winning fruit.
  • W. Roush
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Science
  • 20 October 1995
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Protein Builds Second Skeleton
  • W. Roush
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Science
  • 30 August 1996
The villain in a rare inherited disease that relentlessly converts the body's soft connective tissues into bone lurks within the victims' own immune systems, researchers have found. In the disease,Expand
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Hunting for Animal Alternatives
Scientists in product testing and research are trying to reduce the number of animal experiments performed, such as the Draize rabbit eye irritation test, but they face roadblocks ranging fromExpand
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Medical Research: Guarding Against Premature Birth
Boston—Babies born prematurely are 120 times more likely to die than those carried to full term, so the recent discovery that bacterial infections of the mother's reproductive tract are one cause ofExpand
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Putting the Brakes on Bone Growth
  • W. Roush
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Science
  • 2 August 1996
Bone growth is a tightly controlled process, in which cartilage cells slowly differentiate into a scaffold for bone cells. If the differentiation happens too fast, growth is cut short and stubbyExpand
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Biology Departments Restructure
  • W. Roush
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Science
  • 14 March 1997
A wave of reorganization is striking U.S. biology departments, and many are splitting according to level of study—molecules versus ecosystems. But there's also a growing backlash against this trend,Expand
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Putting a Price Tag on Nature's Bounty
Ecological EconomicsHow much is the world worth? About $33 trillion, according to a controversial new study by ecologists and economists who teamed up to estimate the value of the goods and servicesExpand
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Hackers taking a byte out of computer crime
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