• Publications
  • Influence
Causation and Laws of Nature in Early Modern Philosophy
  • W. Ott
  • Philosophy
  • 2 November 2009
Introduction PART I: THE CARTESIAN PREDICAMENT 1. What mechanism isn't 2. The rejection of Aristotelianism 3. The nude wax: Cartesian ontology 4. The laws of nature 5. Force 6. Occasionalism PART II:Expand
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Phenomenal Intentionality and the Problem of Representation
  • W. Ott
  • Psychology
  • Journal of the American Philosophical Association
  • 30 March 2016
ABSTRACT: According to the phenomenal intentionality research program, a state's intentional content is fixed by its phenomenal character. Defenders of this view have little to say about just howExpand
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  • PDF
Propositional Attitudes in Modern Philosophy
  • W. Ott
  • Philosophy
  • Dialogue
  • 1 June 2002
Résumé Les philosophes de la période moderne sont souvent présentés comme ayant commis une erreur élémentaire: celle de confondre la force propositionnelle avec le contenu propositionnel. ParExpand
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Locke's Philosophy of Language
  • W. Ott
  • Philosophy
  • 1 November 2003
Acknowledgements Note on textual references Introduction 1. Signs and signification 2. Particles and propositions 3. Essence and abstraction 4. Locke contra the Aristotelians: signification andExpand
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What is Locke's Theory of Representation?
  • W. Ott
  • Philosophy
  • 1 December 2012
On a currently popular reading of Locke, an idea represents its cause, or what God intended to be its cause. Against Martha Bolton and my former self (among others), I argue that Locke cannot holdExpand
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Did Legal Positivism Render German Jurists Defenceless During the Third Reich ?
National socialism contrived to impose itself on its followers, soldiers on the one hand, jurists on the other, by dint of two principles: ’Orders are orders’, and ’a law is a law’. The principlesExpand
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Aristotle and Plato on Character
Little about Aristotle's chapter on the voluntariness of character (NE iii 5) is uncontroversial.l Some arguments Aristotle deploys are on their face formally invalid; the position he appears toExpand
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Locke's Philosophy of Language: Signs and signification
  • W. Ott
  • Philosophy
  • 1 November 2003
Any discussion of Locke's views on language must begin by explicating his central linguistic notion: signification. This is by no means an easy task, as the sheer variety of available conceptions ofExpand
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Leges Sive Natura
Locke on Language
John Locke is the first modern philosopher to offer a comprehensive philosophy of language. After discussing Locke's aims and scope, I explore Locke's main linguistic category, signification, and theExpand
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