• Publications
  • Influence
Stress and strain in the mandibular symphysis of primates: a test of competing hypotheses.
  • W. Hylander
  • Biology, Medicine
  • American journal of physical anthropology
  • 1 May 1984
The primary purpose of this study was to test various hypotheses about symphyseal stress in primates. First, those patterns of symphyseal strain that would be associated with various hypotheticalExpand
  • 332
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Comparative functional analysis of skull morphology of tree-gouging primates.
Many primates habitually feed on tree exudates such as gums and saps. Among these exudate feeders, Cebuella pygmaea, Callithrix spp., Phaner furcifer, and most likely Euoticus elegantulus elicitExpand
  • 193
  • 24
Mandibular function in Galago crassicaudatus and Macaca fascicularis: An in vivo approach to Stress Analysis of the mandible
  • W. Hylander
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of morphology
  • 1 February 1979
Single‐element and/or rosette strain gages were bonded to mandibular cortical bone in Galago crassicaudatus and Macaca fascicularis. Five galago and eleven macaque bone strain experiments wereExpand
  • 319
  • 22
Mandibular Function and Biomechanical Stress and Scaling
Patterns of stress were analyzed in the mandibular symphysis of Macaca fascicularis using rosette strain gages. During jaw opening, the mandibular symphysis is bent due to medial transverse bendingExpand
  • 304
  • 22
Masticatory-stress hypotheses and the supraorbital region of primates.
The purpose of this study is to test various masticatory-stress hypotheses about the evolution and function of well-developed browridges of higher primates. This was done by measuring and analyzingExpand
  • 193
  • 22
In vivo bone strain patterns in the zygomatic arch of macaques and the significance of these patterns for functional interpretations of craniofacial form.
It has been proposed that the mammalian facial skeleton is optimized for countering or dissipating masticatory stress. As optimized load-bearing structures by definition exhibit maximum strength withExpand
  • 186
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Experimental analysis of temporomandibular joint reaction force in macaques.
  • W. Hylander
  • Biology, Medicine
  • American journal of physical anthropology
  • 1 September 1979
Mandibular bone strain in the region immediately below the temporomandibular ligament was analyzed in adult and sub-adult Macaca fascicularis and Macaca mulatta. Following recovery from the generalExpand
  • 238
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The functional significance of primate mandibular form
  • W. Hylander
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of morphology
  • 1 May 1979
A stress analysis of the primate mandible suggests that vertically deep jaws in the molar region are usually an adaptation to counter increased sagittal bending stress about the balancing‐sideExpand
  • 311
  • 16
Jaw muscle function and wishboning of the mandible during mastication in macaques and baboons.
An analysis of in vivo bone strain indicates that the mandibular symphysis of macaques experiences lateral transverse bending or "wishboning" during the power stroke of mastication, and this loadingExpand
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