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The evolution of cooperation.
Cooperation in organisms, whether bacteria or primates, has been a difficulty for evolutionary theory since Darwin. On the assumption that interactions between pairs of individuals occur on aExpand
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The genetical evolution of social behaviour. I.
  • W. Hamilton
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of theoretical biology
  • 1 July 1964
Abstract A genetical mathematical model is described which allows for interactions between relatives on one another's fitness. Making use of Wright's Coefficient of Relationship as the measure of theExpand
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The genetical evolution of social behaviour. II.
  • W. Hamilton
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of theoretical biology
  • 1 July 1964
Grounds for thinking that the model described in the previous paper can be used to support general biological principles of social evolution are briefly discussed. Two principles are presented, theExpand
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Extraordinary Sex Ratios
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Geometry for the selfish herd.
  • W. Hamilton
  • Mathematics, Medicine
  • Journal of theoretical biology
  • 1 May 1971
Abstract This paper presents an antithesis to the view that gregarious behaviour is evolved through benefits to the population or species. Following Galton (1871) and Williams (1964) gregariousExpand
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Heritable true fitness and bright birds: a role for parasites?
Combination of seven surveys of blood parasites in North American passerines reveals weak, highly significant association over species between incidence of chronic blood infections (five genera ofExpand
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The moulding of senescence by natural selection.
  • W. Hamilton
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of theoretical biology
  • 1 September 1966
Abstract The consequences to fitness of several types of small age-specific effects on mortality are formulated mathematically. An effect of given form always has a larger consequence, or at leastExpand
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Dispersal in stable habitats
Simple mathematical models show that adaptations for achieving dispersal retain great importance even in uniform and predictable environments. A parent organism is expected to try to enter a highExpand
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Altruism and Related Phenomena, Mainly in Social Insects
In what sense can the self-sacrificing sterile ant be considered to "struggle for existence" or to endeavor to maximize the numbers of its descendants? Since the founding of the theory of evolutionExpand
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