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Ten species in one: DNA barcoding reveals cryptic species in the neotropical skipper butterfly Astraptes fulgerator.
TLDR
The results add to the evidence that cryptic species are prevalent in tropical regions, a critical issue in efforts to document global species richness, and illustrate the value of DNA barcoding, especially when coupled with traditional taxonomic tools, in disclosing hidden diversity.
DNA barcodes distinguish species of tropical Lepidoptera.
TLDR
It is shown that cytochrome c oxidase I DNA barcodes effectively discriminate among species in three Lepidoptera families from Area de Conservación Guanacaste in northwestern Costa Rica, suggesting DNA barcoding will significantly aid species identification and discovery in tropical settings.
Extreme diversity of tropical parasitoid wasps exposed by iterative integration of natural history, DNA barcoding, morphology, and collections
TLDR
DNA barcoded 2,597 parasitoid wasps belonging to 6 microgastrine braconid genera reared from parapatric tropical dry forest, cloud forest, and rain forest in northwestern Costa Rica and combined these data with records of caterpillar hosts and morphological analyses to result in a much more fine-scaled understanding of Parasitoid diversity and host specificity.
DNA barcodes reveal cryptic host-specificity within the presumed polyphagous members of a genus of parasitoid flies (Diptera: Tachinidae).
TLDR
If general, these results will increase estimates of global species richness and imply that tropical conservation and host-parasite interactions may be more complex than expected.
Simultaneous assessment of the macrobiome and microbiome in a bulk sample of tropical arthropods through DNA metasystematics
TLDR
It is shown that next-generation sequencing (NGS) of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) DNA barcodes can accurately detect 83.5% of individually sequenced species in a bulk sample of terrestrial arthropods from a Costa Rican species-rich site.
Caterpillars lack a resident gut microbiome
TLDR
It was found that microbes in the gut are extremely low-abundance and predominantly leaf-derived, suggesting their transient nature, and suppressing bacteria in tobacco hornworms (Manduca sexta) had no detectable effect on caterpillar growth or survival.
DNA barcodes affirm that 16 species of apparently generalist tropical parasitoid flies (Diptera, Tachinidae) are not all generalists
TLDR
The results reinforce the emerging suspicion that estimates of global species richness are likely underestimates for parasitoids and that the strategy of being a tropical generalist parasitic fly may be yet more unusual than has been envisioned for tachinids.
Wedding biodiversity inventory of a large and complex Lepidoptera fauna with DNA barcoding
TLDR
The early stages of the use of cox1 barcoding to supplement and strengthen the taxonomic platform underpinning the inventory of thousands of sympatric species of caterpillars in tropical dry forest, cloud forest and rain forest in northwestern Costa Rica are described.
Next-generation DNA barcoding: using next-generation sequencing to enhance and accelerate DNA barcode capture from single specimens
TLDR
The potential application of next‐generation sequencing platforms for parallel acquisition of DNA barcode sequences from hundreds of specimens simultaneously is demonstrated and Wolbachia, nontarget species, and heteroplasmic sequences are detected.
Climatic unpredictability and parasitism of caterpillars: implications of global warming.
TLDR
This work compares caterpillar-parasitoid interactions across a broad gradient of climatic variability and finds that the combined data in 15 geographically dispersed databases show a decrease in levels of parasitism as Climatic variability increases.
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