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The faculty of language: what is it, who has it, and how did it evolve?
TLDR
We argue that an understanding of the faculty of language requires substantial interdisciplinary cooperation in evolutionary biology, anthropology, psychology, and neuroscience. Expand
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Morphology and development of the human vocal tract: a study using magnetic resonance imaging.
  • W. Fitch, J. Giedd
  • Biology, Medicine
  • The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
  • 23 August 1999
Magnetic resonance imaging was used to quantify the vocal tract morphology of 129 normal humans, aged 2-25 years. Morphometric data, including midsagittal vocal tract length, shape, and proportions,Expand
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Vocal tract length and formant frequency dispersion correlate with body size in rhesus macaques.
  • W. Fitch
  • Biology, Medicine
  • The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
  • 1 August 1997
Body weight, length, and vocal tract length were measured for 23 rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) of various sizes using radiographs and computer graphic techniques. linear predictive coding analysisExpand
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The evolution of speech: a comparative review
  • W. Fitch
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Trends in Cognitive Sciences
  • 1 July 2000
The evolution of speech can be studied independently of the evolution of language, with the advantage that most aspects of speech acoustics, physiology and neural control are shared with animals, andExpand
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Computational Constraints on Syntactic Processing in a Nonhuman Primate
The capacity to generate a limitless range of meaningful expressions from a finite set of elements differentiates human language from other animal communication systems. Rule systems capable ofExpand
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The faculty of language: what is it, who has it, and how did it evolve?
We argue that an understanding of the faculty of language requires substantial interdisciplinary cooperation. We suggest how current developments in linguistics can be profitably wedded to work inExpand
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Calls out of chaos: the adaptive significance of nonlinear phenomena in mammalian vocal production
Abstract Recent work on human vocal production demonstrates that certain irregular phenomena seen in human pathological voices and baby crying result from nonlinearities in the vocal productionExpand
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The biology and evolution of music: A comparative perspective
  • W. Fitch
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Cognition
  • 1 May 2006
Studies of the biology of music (as of language) are highly interdisciplinary and demand the integration of diverse strands of evidence. In this paper, I present a comparative perspective on theExpand
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Unpacking “Honesty”: Vertebrate Vocal Production and the Evolution of Acoustic Signals
1. Introduction When autumn arrives in northern Europe, female red deer (Cervus elaphus L.) begin to congregate. The mating season has begun. They are soon joined by males, who have spent theExpand
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Motion events in language and cognition
This study investigated whether different lexicalization patterns of motion events in English and Spanish predict how speakers of these languages perform in non-linguistic tasks. Using 36 motionExpand
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