W. Zuiderbaan

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Antagonistic center-surround configurations are a central organizational principle of our visual system. In visual cortex, stimulation outside the classical receptive field can decrease neural activity and also decrease functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) signal amplitudes. Decreased fMRI amplitudes below baseline-0% contrast-are often referred to(More)
Electrical brain signals are often decomposed into frequency ranges that are implicated in different functions. Using subdural electrocorticography (ECoG, intracranial EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we measured frequency spectra and BOLD responses in primary visual cortex (V1) and intraparietal sulcus (IPS). In V1 and IPS, 30-120 Hz(More)
Visual cortex contains a hierarchy of visual areas. The earliest cortical area (V1) contains neurons responding to colour, form and motion. Later areas specialize on processing of specific features. The second visual area (V2) in non-human primates contains a stripe-based anatomical organization, initially defined using cytochrome-oxidase staining of(More)
Our visual system receives an enormous amount of information, but not all information is retained. This is exemplified by the fact that subjects fail to detect large changes in a visual scene, i.e., change-blindness. Current theories propose that our ability to detect these changes is influenced by the gist or interpretation of an image. On the other hand,(More)
A goal of computational models is not only to explain experimental data but also to make new predictions. A current focus of computational neuroimaging is to predict features of the presented stimulus from measured brain signals. These computational neuroimaging approaches may be agnostic about the underlying neural processes or may be biologically(More)
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