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One of the major impediments to the integration of lentic ecosystems into global environmental analyses has been fragmentary data on the extent and size distribution of lakes, ponds, and impoundments. We use new data sources, enhanced spatial resolution, and new analytical approaches to provide new estimates of the global abundance of surface-water bodies.(More)
Because freshwater covers such a small fraction of the Earth's surface area, inland freshwater ecosystems (particularly lakes, rivers, and reservoirs) have rarely been considered as potentially important quantitative components of the carbon cycle at either global or regional scales. By taking published estimates of gas exchange, sediment accumulation, and(More)
N itrogen emissions to the atmosphere due to human ace tivity remain elevated in industrialized regions of the world and are accelerating in many developing regions (Galloway 1995). Although the deposition of sulfur has been reduced over much of the United States and Europe by aggressive environmental protection policies, current nitrogen deposition(More)
Understanding interactions between permanently frozen soils and stream chemistry is important in predicting the effects of management, natural disturbance and changing perma-frost distribution on stream ecosystems and nutrient budgets in subarctic watersheds. Chemical measurements of groundwater, soil water and stream water were made in two watersheds in(More)
Anthropogenic addition of bioavailable nitrogen to the biosphere is increasing and terrestrial ecosystems are becoming increasingly nitrogen-saturated, causing more bioavailable nitrogen to enter groundwater and surface waters. Large-scale nitrogen budgets show that an average of about 20-25 per cent of the nitrogen added to the biosphere is exported from(More)
A comparative (15)N-tracer study of nitrogen dynamics in headwater streams from biomes throughout North America demonstrates that streams exert control over nutrient exports to rivers, lakes, and estuaries. The most rapid uptake and transformation of inorganic nitrogen occurred in the smallest streams. Ammonium entering these streams was removed from the(More)
Yields of total fixed nitrogen and nitrogen fractions are summarized for thirty-one watersheds in which anthropogenic disturbance of the nitrogen cycle, either through land use or atmospheric deposition, is negligible or slight. These yields are taken as representative of background conditions over a broad range of watershed areas, elevations, and(More)
Nitrous oxide (N(2)O) is a potent greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change and stratospheric ozone destruction. Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) loading to river networks is a potentially important source of N(2)O via microbial denitrification that converts N to N(2)O and dinitrogen (N(2)). The fraction of denitrified N that escapes as N(2)O rather than(More)
SUMMARY 1. We studied whole-ecosystem metabolism in eight streams from several biomes in North America to identify controls on the rate of stream metabolism over a large geographic range. The streams studied had climates ranging from tropical to cool-temperate and from humid to arid and were all relatively uninfluenced by human disturbances. 2. Rates of(More)
We measured denitrification rates using a field 15 N–NO { 3 tracer-addition approach in a large, cross-site study of nitrate uptake in reference, agricultural, and suburban–urban streams. We measured denitrification rates in 49 of 72 streams studied. Uptake length due to denitrification (S Wden) ranged from 89 m to 184 km (median of 9050 m) and there were(More)