Vito Cornacchiulo

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Circulating immune complexes (ICs) were isolated by affinity chromatography and sucrose density gradient fractionation during acute and chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Immunochemical and biomolecular studies showed that they basically consist of the virus component, IgG with specific anti-HCV activity and IgM bearing 17.109 epitope (IgM 17.109),(More)
Immunofluorescence (IF) to detect HCV antigens and non-isotopic in situ hybridization (NISH) to detect HCV RNA genome were carried out on bone marrow (BM) and peripheral blood (PB) mononuclear cells (MC) of 11 chronically HCV-infected patients. In four patients (36.4%) HCV antigens were detected in monocytes/macrophages as well as in B lymphocytes in both(More)
Type II mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) is an often progressive vasculitis characterized by circulating cold-precipitable proteins that usually consists of polyclonal IgG and monoclonal IgM kappa with rheumatoid factor (RF) activity. Its etiology is unknown, although recent evidence strongly suggests that hepatitis C virus (HCV) plays a major role.(More)
The role of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the pathogenesis of type II mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) has been strongly emphasized in the last few years. Although MC is a benign lymphoproliferative disorder, the risk of overt B-cell malignancy greatly increases during its course. The occurrence of HCV infection in 10% to 30% of patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma(More)
BACKGROUND The overwhelming evidence that chronic infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important cause of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is based on epidemiologic, case-control, and cohort studies as well as laboratory investigations. To address better the pathogenesis of HCV infection at the single-cell level, the authors developed a specific(More)
The role of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the pathogenesis of type II mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) has been strongly emphasized in the last few years. Although MC is a benign lymphoproliferative disorder, the risk of overt B-cell malignancy greatly increases during its course. The occurrence of HCV infection in 10Y0 to 30% of patients with non-Hodgkin‘s(More)
Skin and/or liver biopsy specimens were obtained from the following patients: 15 anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV), HCV RNA-positive patients and 3 anti-HCV, HCV RNA-negative patients with type II mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC); 7 anti-HCV, HCV RNA-positive patients with chronic active liver disease (CALD); 5 anti-HCV, HCV RNA-negative patients with(More)
Although hepatitis C virus (HCV) mainly affects hepatocytes, infection is widespread and involves immunologically privileged sites. Whether lymphoid cells represent further targets of early HCV infection, or whether other cells in the hematopoietic microenvironment may serve as a potential virus reservoir, is still unclear. We studied whether pluripotent(More)
OBJECTIVE Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-associated antigens (Ags) are hard to detect and poorly defined in liver tissue, and are of uncertain interpretation. The failure of immunohistochemistry in HCV infection may be due to the affinity of specific antisera, the levels of Ags in infected tissues, the labile and unstable expression of antigenic determinants, and(More)
Clonal rearrangements of Ig heavy chain (IgH) genes and hepatitis C virus (HCV) genomic sequences were assayed on intrahepatic B lymphocytes isolated from HCV chronically infected patients with and without type II mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC). Liver tissue samples from eight patients with and nine without MC were subjected to routine histologic studies,(More)