Vitaly I. Voloshin

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We introduce the notion of a of a hypergraph, which is a subset of vertices to be colored so that at least two vertices are of the same color. Hypergraphs with both and are called mixed hypergraphs. The maximal number of colors for which there exists a mixed hypergraph coloring using all the colors is called the upper chromatic number of a hypergraph H and(More)
We investigate the coloring properties of mixed interval hypergraphs having two families of subsets: the edges and the co-edges. In every edge at least two vertices have different colors. The notion of a co-edge was introduced recently in [2,3]: in every such a subset at least two vertices have the same color. The upper (lower) chromatic number is defined(More)
A mixed hypergraph H = (X; A; E) consists of the vertex set X and two families of subsets: the family E of edges and the family A of co-edges. In a coloring every edge E 2 E has at least two vertices of diierent colors, while every co-edge A 2 A has at least two vertices of the same color. The largest (smallest) number of colors for which there exists a(More)
A mixed hypergraph is a triple H = (X, C,D), where X is the vertex set, and each of C, D is a list of subsets of X. A strict k-coloring of H is a surjection c : X → {1, . . . , k} such that each member of C has two vertices assigned a common value and each member of D has two vertices assigned distinct values. The feasible set of H is {k : H has a strict(More)
A mixed hypergraph is a triple H = (X, C,D) where X is the vertex set and each of C, D is a family of subsets of X, the C-edges and D-edges, respectively. A k-coloring of H is a mapping c : X → [k] such that each C-edge has two vertices with the same color and each D-edge has two vertices with distinct colors. H = (X, C,D) is called a mixed hypertree if(More)
A mixed hypergraph consists of two families of edges: the C-edges and D-edges. In a coloring every C-edge has at least two vertices of the same color, while every D-edge has at least two vertices colored differently. The largest and smallest possible numbers of colors in a coloring are termed the upper and lower chromatic number, χ̄ and χ, respectively. A(More)