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Several large population-based or clinical trial studies have suggested that certain dihydropyridine (DHP) L-type calcium channel blockers (CCBs) used for the treatment of hypertension may confer protection against the development of Alzheimer disease (AD). However, other studies with drugs of the same class have shown no beneficial clinical effects. To(More)
Key pathological processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD) include the accumulation of amyloid beta peptide (Abeta) which, in excess, triggers pathological cascades including widespread inflammation, partly reflected by chronic microglial activation. It has previously been suggested that CD40/CD40L interaction promotes AD like pathology in transgenic mice.(More)
The different alleles of the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE-gene, ApoE-protein) have been reported to influence recovery after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in both human patients and animal models, with the e4 allele typically conferring poorer prognosis for recovery. How the E4 allele, and consequently the ApoE4 isoform, affects recovery is unknown, but(More)
BACKGROUND Abeta deposits represent a neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Both soluble and insoluble Abeta species are considered to be responsible for initiating the pathological cascade that eventually leads to AD. Therefore, the identification of therapeutic approaches that can lower Abeta production or accumulation remains a(More)
Beta-amyloid peptides (Abeta) are the major constituents of senile plaques and cerebrovascular deposits in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients. We have shown previously that soluble forms of Abeta are anti-angiogenic both in vitro and in vivo. However, the mechanism of the anti-angiogenic activity of Abeta peptides is unclear. In this study, we(More)
Background: Ab deposits represent a neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Both soluble and insoluble Ab species are considered to be responsible for initiating the pathological cascade that eventually leads to AD. Therefore, the identification of therapeutic approaches that can lower Ab production or accumulation remains a priority. NFB(More)
Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is a common pathological feature of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and it is also the hallmark of individuals with a rare autosomal dominant disorder known as hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type. We have shown previously that wild type A(beta) peptides are anti-angiogenic both in vitro and in vivo(More)
We have previously shown that transgenic mice carrying a mutant human APP but deficient in CD40L, display a decrease in astrocytosis and microgliosis associated with a lower amount of deposited Abeta. Furthermore, an anti-CD40L treatment causes a diminution of Abeta pathology in the brain and an improved performance in several cognitive tasks in the double(More)
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among the aging population and is characterized pathologically by the progressive intracerebral accumulation of beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptides and neurofibrillary tangles. The level of proangiogenic growth factors and inflammatory mediators with proangiogenic activity is known to be elevated in AD(More)
Amyloid peptides 1-40 and 1-42 (Abeta 1-40 and Abeta 1-42) are major components of diffuse and neuritic senile plaques present in the brain of patients with Alzheimers disease. Their interaction with microglial cells was studied using a system partly mimicking these plaques, which consisted in heat-killed yeast particles coated with either Abeta 1-40 or(More)