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The phenotypic transformation of well-differentiated epithelial carcinoma into a mesenchymal-like state provides cancer cells with the ability to disseminate locally and to metastasise. Different degrees of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) have been found to occur in carcinomas from breast, colon and ovarian carcinoma (OC), among others. Numerous(More)
Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Discovery of novel therapeutic opportunities for EOC is important for the improvement of clinical outcome of the patients. Emerging evidence is suggesting that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a crucial role in the aggressiveness in EOC including increasing migration and(More)
Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a crucial mechanism in carcinoma progression, describes the process whereby epithelial cells lose their apico-basal polarity and junctional complexes and acquire a mesenchymal-like morphology. Several markers are considered to be authentic indicators of an epithelial or mesenchymal status; however, there is currently(More)
Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a biological process by which polarized epithelial cells convert into a mesenchymal phenotype, has been implicated to contribute to the molecular heterogeneity of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Here we report that a transcription factor--Grainyhead-like 2 (GRHL2) maintains the epithelial phenotype. EOC tumours with(More)
Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a crucial mechanism in development, mediates aggressiveness during carcinoma progression and therapeutic refractoriness. The reversibility of EMT makes it an attractive strategy in designing novel therapeutic approaches. Therefore, drug discovery pipelines for EMT reversal are in need to discover emerging classes of(More)
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