Viktor V. Roschke

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The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily of cytokines includes both soluble and membrane-bound proteins that regulate immune responses. A member of the human TNF family, BLyS (B lymphocyte stimulator), was identified that induced B cell proliferation and immunoglobulin secretion. BLyS expression on human monocytes could be up-regulated by(More)
B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) is a recently identified novel member of the tumor necrosis factor ligand superfamily shown to exist in a membrane-bound and soluble form. BLyS was found to be specifically expressed on cells of myeloid lineage and to selectively stimulate B-lymphocyte proliferation and immunoglobulin production. The expression of a cytokine(More)
PSGR, a new prostate tissue-specific gene with homology to the G protein-coupled odorant receptor gene family, has been identified. Here we report the characteristics of the predicted protein sequence of PSGR and its prostate tissue specificity and expression profile in human prostate cancer and matched normal tissues. Using multiple tissue Northern blots(More)
The recognition that few human diseases are thoroughly addressed by mono-specific, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) continues to drive the development of antibody therapeutics with additional specificities and enhanced activity. Historically, efforts to engineer additional antigen recognition into molecules have relied predominantly on the reformatting of(More)
Despite the clinical success of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapies in the treatment of inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn disease and psoriasis, full control of the diseases only occurs in a subset of patients and there is a need for new therapeutics with improved efficacy against broader patient populations. One possible(More)
Although substantial research effort has focused on developing pharmacological treatments for cocaine abuse, no effective medications have been developed. Recent studies show that enzymes that metabolize cocaine in the periphery, forestalling its entry into the brain, can prevent cocaine toxicity and its behavioral effects in rodents. Here we report on(More)
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