Viktor K. Jirsa

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A broad body of experimental work has demonstrated that apparently spontaneous brain activity is not random. At the level of large-scale neural systems, as measured with functional MRI (fMRI), this ongoing activity reflects the organization of a series of highly coherent functional networks. These so-called resting-state networks (RSNs) closely relate to(More)
A growing body of neuroimaging research has documented that, in the absence of an explicit task, the brain shows temporally coherent activity. This so-called "resting state" activity or, more explicitly, the default-mode network, has been associated with daydreaming, free association, stream of consciousness, or inner rehearsal in humans, but similar(More)
The cortex is a complex system, characterized by its dynamics and architecture, which underlie many functions such as action, perception, learning, language, and cognition. Its structural architecture has been studied for more than a hundred years; however, its dynamics have been addressed much less thoroughly. In this paper, we review and integrate, in a(More)
Traditionally brain function is studied through measuring physiological responses in controlled sensory, motor, and cognitive paradigms. However, even at rest, in the absence of overt goal-directed behavior, collections of cortical regions consistently show temporally coherent activity. In humans, these resting state networks have been shown to greatly(More)
The ongoing activity of the brain at rest, i.e., under no stimulation and in absence of any task, is astonishingly highly structured into spatiotemporal patterns. These spatiotemporal patterns, called resting state networks, display low-frequency characteristics (<0.1 Hz) observed typically in the BOLD-fMRI signal of human subjects. We aim here to(More)
In absence of all goal-directed behavior, a characteristic network of cortical regions involving prefrontal and cingulate cortices consistently shows temporally coherent fluctuations. The origin of these fluctuations is unknown, but has been hypothesized to be of stochastic nature. In the present paper we test the hypothesis that time delays in the network(More)
Resting-state networks (RSNs), which have become a main focus in neuroimaging research, can be best simulated by large-scale cortical models in which networks teeter on the edge of instability. In this state, the functional networks are in a low firing stable state while they are continuously pulled towards multiple other configurations. Small extrinsic(More)
Early in life, brain development carries with it a large number of structural changes that impact the functional interactions of distributed neuronal networks. Such changes enhance information processing capacity, moving the brain from a deterministic system to one that is more stochastic. The evidence from empirical studies with EEG and functional MRI(More)
The differentiation of discrete and continuous movement is one of the pillars of motor behavior classification. Discrete movements have a definite beginning and end, whereas continuous movements do not have such discriminable end points. In the past decade there has been vigorous debate whether this classification implies different control processes. This(More)