Victoria Murphy

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Experimental evidence indicates that regular plurals are nearly always omitted from English compounds (e.g., rats-eater) while irregular plurals may be included within these structures (e.g., mice-chaser). This phenomenon is considered to be good evidence to support the dual mechanism model of morphological processing (Pinker & Prince, 1992). However,(More)
Compound words with irregular plural nouns in first position (e.g. mice-eater) are produced far more frequently than compound words with regular plural nouns in first position (e.g. *rats-eater), (Gordon, 1985). Using empirical evidence and neural net modelling, the studies presented here demonstrate how a single route, associative memory based account(More)
Native English speakers include irregular plurals in English noun-noun compounds (e.g. mice chaser) more frequently than regular plurals (e.g. *rats chaser) (Gordon, 1985). This dissociation in inflectional morphology has been argued to stem from an internal and innate morphological constraint as it is thought that the input to which English speaking(More)
Compound words with irregular plural nouns in first position (e.g. mice-eater) are produced far more frequently than compound words with regular plural nouns in first position (e.g. *rats-eater), (Gordon, 1985). Using empirical evidence and neural net modelling, the studies presented here demonstrate how a single route, associative memory based account(More)
The treatment of plural morphemes in English noun-noun compounds is significant because it provides a test case for competing theories of language acquisition and representation. Even when the first noun in a compound refers to plural items, native speakers frequently use the singular form (Murphy, 2000). Sometimes, they will use the irregular plural form(More)
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