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Genomic and archaeological evidence suggest a dual origin of domestic dogs
TLDR
Results suggest that dogs may have been domesticated independently in Eastern and Western Eurasia from distinct wolf populations, and East Eurasian dogs were then possibly transported to Europe with people, where they partially replaced European Paleolithic dogs.
Ancient proteins resolve the evolutionary history of Darwin’s South American ungulates
TLDR
Proteomic analysis is applied to screen bone samples of the Late Quaternary South American native ungulate taxa Toxodon and Macrauchenia for phylogenetically informative protein sequences and the resulting consensus tree agrees well with recent higher-level mammalian phylogenies.
Ancient goat genomes reveal mosaic domestication in the Fertile Crescent
TLDR
It is demonstrated that multiple divergent ancient wild goat sources were domesticated in a dispersed process that resulted in genetically and geographically distinct Neolithic goat populations, echoing contemporaneous human divergence across the region.
Ancient cattle genomics, origins, and rapid turnover in the Fertile Crescent
TLDR
Genome-wide analysis of 67 ancient Near Eastern cattle remains reveals regional variation that has since been obscured by admixture in modern populations, and mitochondrial DNA stasis supports that this introgression was male-driven, suggesting that selection of arid-adapted zebu bulls enhanced herd survival.
Ancient pigs reveal a near-complete genomic turnover following their introduction to Europe
TLDR
While pigs were not independently domesticated in Europe, the vast majority of human-mediated selection over the past 5,000 y focused on the genomic fraction derived from the European wild boars, and not on the fraction that was selected by early Neolithic farmers over the first 2,500 y of the domestication process.
Ancient genomes reveal tropical bovid species in the Tibetan Plateau contributed to the prevalence of hunting game until the late Neolithic
TLDR
Results demonstrate that the range of the present-day tropical gaur extended as far north as the margins of the NETP during the late Neolithic from ∼29°N to ∼34°N, thus providing abundant hunting resources for humans and facilitating the exploration of the Tibetan Plateau as one of the last habitats for hunting game in East Asia.
A 3,000-year-old Egyptian emmer wheat genome reveals dispersal and domestication history
TLDR
The genome of a museum specimen of Egyptian emmer wheat chaff dated back to 3,000 years ago is sequenced, revealing the unique genetic diversity contained in this ancient sample as well as the domestication and dispersal history of emmer Wheat.
Screening archaeological bone for palaeogenetic and palaeoproteomic studies
The recovery and analysis of ancient DNA and protein from archaeological bone is time-consuming and expensive to carry out, while it involves the partial or complete destruction of valuable or rare
Holocene range collapse of giant muntjacs and pseudo‐endemism in the Annamite large mammal fauna
TLDR
No support is found for recognizing extinct and living giant muntjacs as distinct taxa, and post-glacial populations from China and the Annamites should probably all be referred to M. gigas, demonstrating that current-day Asian mammalian biogeography has been shaped by an extinction filter.
Presentations - 3,000 year old Egyptian emmer wheat
Presentations summarise the results of a project analysing whole-genome sequences of archaeological emmer wheat specimens from Egypt (https://doi.org/10.1038/s41477-019-0534-5).
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