Victor P. J. Gannon

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Escherichia coli O104:H4 was associated with a severe foodborne disease outbreak originating in Germany in May 2011. More than 4000 illnesses and 50 deaths were reported. The outbreak strain was a typical enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) that acquired an antibiotic resistance plasmid and a Shiga-toxin 2 (Stx2)-encoding bacteriophage. Based on whole-genome(More)
Cattle are the primary reservoir of the foodborne pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7, with the concentration and frequency of E. coli O157:H7 shedding varying substantially among individual hosts. The term ''super-shedder" has been applied to cattle that shed ≥10(4) cfu E. coli O157:H7/g of feces. Super-shedders have been reported to be responsible for the(More)
Predictive genomics is the translation of raw genome sequence data into a phenotypic assessment of the organism. For bacterial pathogens, these phenotypes can range from environmental survivability, to the severity of human disease. Significant progress has been made in the development of generic tools for genomic analyses that are broadly applicable to all(More)
For nearly 100 years serotyping has been the gold standard for the identification of Salmonella serovars. Despite the increasing adoption of DNA-based subtyping approaches, serotype information remains a cornerstone in food safety and public health activities aimed at reducing the burden of salmonellosis. At the same time, recent advances in whole-genome(More)
Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are significant public health threats. Although STEC O157 are recognized foodborne pathogens, non-O157 STEC are also important causes of human disease. We characterized 10 O157:H7 and 15 non-O157 clinical STEC derived from British Columbia (BC). Eae, hlyA, and stx were more frequently observed in STEC O157, and(More)
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