Learn More
Macrophages activated by the Gram-negative bacterial product lipopolysaccharide switch their core metabolism from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis. Here we show that inhibition of glycolysis with 2-deoxyglucose suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced interleukin-1β but not tumour-necrosis factor-α in mouse macrophages. A comprehensive metabolic map of(More)
Granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages of the myeloid lineage are the chief cellular agents of innate immunity. Here, we have examined the inflammatory response in mice with conditional knockouts of the hypoxia responsive transcription factor HIF-1alpha, its negative regulator VHL, and a known downstream target, VEGF. We find that activation of HIF-1alpha(More)
The hypoxic response is an ancient stress response triggered by low ambient oxygen (O2) (ref. 1) and controlled by hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1 (HIF-1), whose alpha subunit is rapidly degraded under normoxia but stabilized when O2-dependent prolyl hydroxylases (PHDs) that target its O2-dependent degradation domain are inhibited. Thus, the amount(More)
Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is an important transcriptional regulator of cell metabolism and the adaptation to cellular stress caused by oxygen deficiency (hypoxia). Phagocytic cells have an essential role in innate immune defence against pathogens and this is a battle that takes place mainly in the hypoxic microenvironments of infected tissues. It has(More)
The innate immune response plays a crucial role in satisfactory host resolution of bacterial infection. In response to chemotactic signals, neutrophils are early responding cells that migrate in large numbers to sites of infection. The recent discovery of secreted neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) composed of DNA and histones opened a novel dimension in(More)
In mammals, several gene families encode peptides with antibacterial activity, such as the beta-defensins and cathelicidins. These peptides are expressed on epithelial surfaces and in neutrophils, and have been proposed to provide a first line of defence against infection by acting as 'natural antibiotics'. The protective effect of antimicrobial peptides is(More)
Cells must amplify external signals to orient and migrate in chemotactic gradient fields. We find that human neutrophils release adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from the leading edge of the cell surface to amplify chemotactic signals and direct cell orientation by feedback through P2Y2 nucleotide receptors. Neutrophils rapidly hydrolyze released ATP to(More)
Hypoxia is a characteristic feature of the tissue microenvironment during bacterial infection. Here we report on our use of conditional gene targeting to examine the contribution of hypoxia-inducible factor 1, alpha subunit (HIF-1alpha) to myeloid cell innate immune function. HIF-1alpha was induced by bacterial infection, even under normoxia, and regulated(More)
Cathelicidins are a family of peptides thought to provide an innate defensive barrier against a variety of potential microbial pathogens. The human and mouse cathelicidins (LL-37 and CRAMP, respectively) are expressed at select epithelial interfaces where they have been proposed to kill a number of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. To determine if(More)
NOD2, a NOD-like receptor (NLR), is an intracellular sensor of bacterial muramyl dipeptide (MDP) that was suggested to promote secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1beta. Yet, the molecular mechanism by which NOD2 can stimulate IL-1beta secretion, and its biological significance were heretofore unknown. We found that NOD2 through its N-terminal(More)