Vera Cherepinsky

Learn More
The current standard correlation coefficient used in the analysis of microarray data was introduced by M. B. Eisen, P. T. Spellman, P. O. Brown, and D. Botstein [(1998) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 95, 14863-14868]. Its formulation is rather arbitrary. We give a mathematically rigorous correlation coefficient of two data vectors based on James-Stein shrinkage(More)
We collaborate in a research program aimed at creating a rigorous framework, experimental infrastructure, and computational environment for understanding, experimenting with, manipulating, and modifying a diverse set of fundamental biological processes at multiple scales and spatio-temporal modes. The novelty of our research is based on an approach that (i)(More)
Microarray technology, in its simplest form, allows one to gather abundance data for target DNA molecules, associated with genomes or gene-expressions, and relies on hybridizing the target to many short probe oligonucleotides arrayed on a surface. While for such multiplexed reactions conditions are optimized to make the most of each individual probe-target(More)
We collaborate in a research program aimed at creating a rigorous framework, experimental infrastructure, and computational environment for understanding, experimenting with, manipulating, and modifying a diverse set of fundamental biological processes at multiple scales and spatio-temporal modes. The novelty of our research is based on an approach that (i)(More)
The current standard correlation coefficient used in the analysis of microarray data, including gene expression arrays, was introduced in [1]. Its formulation is rather arbitrary. We give a mathematically rigorous derivation of the correlation coefficient of two gene expression vectors based on James-Stein Shrinkage estimators. We use the background(More)
Its formulation is rather arbitrary. We give a mathematically rigorous correlation coefficient of two data vectors based on James– Stein shrinkage estimators. We use the assumptions described by Eisen et al., also using the fact that the data can be treated as transformed into normal distributions. While Eisen et al. use zero as an estimator for the(More)
  • 1