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Signaling through the store-operated Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channel regulates critical cellular functions, including gene expression, cell growth and differentiation, and Ca(2+) homeostasis. Loss-of-function mutations in the CRAC channel pore-forming protein ORAI1 or the Ca(2+) sensing protein stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) result in(More)
Ca(2+) signaling is essential for bone homeostasis and skeletal development. Here, we show that the transient receptor potential canonical 1 (TRPC1) channel and the inhibitor of MyoD family, I-mfa, function antagonistically in the regulation of osteoclastogenesis. I-mfa null mice have an osteopenic phenotype characterized by increased osteoclast numbers and(More)
WNT ligands induce Ca(2+) signalling on target cells. PKD1 (polycystin 1) is considered an orphan, atypical G-protein-coupled receptor complexed with TRPP2 (polycystin 2 or PKD2), a Ca(2+)-permeable ion channel. Inactivating mutations in their genes cause autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), one of the most common genetic diseases. Here, we(More)
Cancer cells actively promote aerobic glycolysis to sustain their metabolic requirements through mechanisms not always clear. Here, we demonstrate that the gatekeeper of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, Mitochondrial Calcium Uptake 1 (MICU1/CBARA1) drives aerobic glycolysis in ovarian cancer. We show that MICU1 is overexpressed in a panel of ovarian cancer cell(More)
The TRPC1 ion channel was the first mammalian TRP channel to be cloned. In humans, it is encoded by the TRPC1 gene located in chromosome 3. The protein is predicted to consist of six transmembrane segments with the N- and C-termini located in the cytoplasm. The extracellular loop connecting transmembrane segments 5 and 6 participates in the formation of the(More)
Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is caused by inactivating mutations in PKD1 (85%) or PKD2 (15%). The ADPKD proteins encoded by these genes, polycystin-1 (PC1) and polycystin-2 (PC2), form a plasma membrane receptor-ion channel complex. However, the mechanisms controlling the subcellular localization of PC1 and PC2 are poorly understood.(More)
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