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Alloimmune neonatal neutropenia (ANN) is a rare but potentially life-threatening disorder of neonates. Demonstration of alloantibodies against granulocyte-specific antigens shared by neonatal and paternal granulocytes in the maternal serum is essential in the diagnosis of ANN. In contrast to granulocyte-specific alloantibodies, the significance of human(More)
Alloimmunization to granulocyte-specific antigens can occur during pregnancy. Maternal antibodies of IgG class can cross the placenta to result in alloimmune neonatal neutropenia. Antibodies to human neutrophil antigens anti-HNA-1a, HNA-1b, and HNA-2a have been most commonly reported to cause alloimmune neonatal neutropenia. Isoantibodies to Fc gamma RIIIb(More)
Alloimmunization to granulocyte-specific antigens can occur during pregnancy. Maternal IgG can cross the placenta and result in neonatal neutropenia. The clinical course of alloimmune neonatal neutropenia is usually self-limiting with only mild infection. However, in severe cases complicated with bacterial sepsis it is a potentially life-threatening(More)
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