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Parasitic and Phoretic Mites Associated with Neotropical Harvestmen from Trinidad, West Indies
TLDR
Overall, the prevalence of infestation for Neotropical harvestmen from the Caribbean island of Trinidad was 9.9%, with significant interspecific variation in the intensity of mite infestation and significant differences in parasitism of hosts between habitats.
Comparative study of walking and climbing speeds among Neotropical harvestmen from Costa Rica
TLDR
This study compared walking and climbing speeds for five common species from Costa Rica representing the families Cosmetidae, Gonyleptidae, Sclerosomatidae, Cosmet families, and Sclerotidae, finding no significant interspecific differences in climbing speed.
Diversity and Habitat Use of Neotropical Harvestmen (Arachnida: Opiliones) in a Costa Rican Rainforest
TLDR
The analysis of covariance supports the hypothesis that leg length is related to climbing behavior for several species belonging to Eupnoi and Laniatores, and provides the first insights into the diverse assemblage of harvestmen inhabiting a wet forest at La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica.
The Ecological Significance of Leg Autotomy for Climbing Temperate Species of Harvestmen (Arachnida, Opiliones, Sclerosomatidae)
TLDR
It is inferred that leg autotomy is a common (and effective) evasive tactic used by harvestmen, however, the reduction in walking and climbing speeds resulting from leg loss may also affect habitat selection and may ultimately reduce the survivorship of individuals in future encounters with predators.
Variation in ovipositor morphology among laniatorean harvestmen (Arachnida: Opiliones)
TLDR
Using scanning electron microscopy, characters based upon ovipositor morphology have the potential to illuminate phylogenetic relationships within and between families and genera in these harvestmen.
EXTERNAL MORPHOLOGY AND ULTRASTRUCTURE OF THE PREHENSILE REGION OF THE LEGS OF LEIOBUNUM NIGRIPES (ARACHNIDA, OPILIONES)
TLDR
Species of harvestmen (Arachnida, Opiliones, Palpatores) in the family Sclerosomatidae frequently employ prehensile flexion of the telotarsus during locomotion and are observed to anchor themselves to objects by wrapping their legs around these objects.
INTRA- AND INTERSPECIFIC CHARACTERIZATIONS OF BURROW USE AND DEFENSE BY JUVENILE AMBYSTOMATID SALAMANDERS
TLDR
These experiments demonstrate that juvenile A. opacum may defend burrow space by excluding heterospecific salamanders, and indicate that species-specific behavioral differences may influence patterns of burrow use, which may reduce the importance of agonistic interactions under natural conditions.
The interaction of temperature, dissolved oxygen and predation pressure in an aquatic predator-prey system
TLDR
Environmental conditions had significant effects on the behavior of tadpoles that increased the risk of attack by Dolomedes, and survival analyses showed a significantly earlier expression of predatory behaviors in decreased oxygen level treatments.
Ontogenetic variation in the sensory structures on the pedipalps of cosmetid harvestmen (Arachnida, Opiliones, Laniatores)
TLDR
Using scanning electron microscopy to examine the distribution of cuticular structures on the elements of the pedipalps of adults and nymphs of three species of cosmetid harvestmen indicates that there is considerable ontogenetic variation in the morphology of the trochanter, femur, patella, tibia, and tarsus.
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