• Publications
  • Influence
The evolution of nocturnal behaviour in sweat bees, Megalopta genalis and M. ecuadoria (Hymenoptera: Halictidae): an escape from competitors and enemies?
TLDR
Overall nest survivorship rates were comparable to those for diurnal relatives, but rates of cell parasitism for Megalopta (< < 5%) were substantially lower than they are for day-flying relatives, offering some support for the hypothesis that the evolution of nocturnal behaviour enables escape from natural enemies.
Mexican Stingless Bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae): Diversity, Distribution, and Indigenous Knowledge
TLDR
The diversity, distribution, origin, and traditional uses of the stingless bees in Mexico are summarized and the challenges and future directions for the study and conservation of this important lineage of bees are discussed.
New orchid and leaf‐cutter bee gynandromorphs, with an updated review (Hymenoptera, Apoidea)
Two new cases of gynandromorphs in bees are described and figured: a mixed, nearly bilateral gynandromorph of the orchid bee Euglossa (Euglossa) tridentata Moure and a mixed gynandromorph of the
Global invasion by Anthidium manicatum (Linnaeus) (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae): assessing potential distribution in North America and beyond
TLDR
The wool carder bee, Anthidium manicatum, is the most widely distributed unmanaged bee in the world and its naturalization in North America, possibly through punctuated dispersal, the probability of suitable habitats across the globe and the synanthropy exhibited by this invasive species are discussed.
Phylogeny of the bee family Megachilidae (Hymenoptera: Apoidea) based on adult morphology
TLDR
A cladistic analysis of adult external morphological characters shows that Fideliinae and the tribes Anthidiini and Osmiini ofMegachilinae are paraphyletic; it supports the monophyly of Megachilinee, including the extinct taxa, and the sister group relationship of Lithurgini to the remaining megachilines.
Growth rates, reproductive phenology, and pollination ecology of Espeletia grandiflora (Asteraceae), a giant Andean caulescent rosette.
TLDR
It is suggested that even small contributions from a wide range of pollinators might be advantageous for pollination of E. grandiflora, a giant caulescent rosette from the Páramos of the Eastern Andes of Colombia.
Nesting and social behavior of a wood-dwelling neotropical bee, Augochlora isthmii (Schwarz), and notes on a new species, A. alexanderi engel (Hymenoptera: Halictidae)
TLDR
Nests of A. isthmii sometimes contained more than one female, suggesting some form of social behavior, while other females nested alone, and an occupied nest of a second, related species was discovered in southern Colombia, supporting the conclusion that females of the repandirostris species-group regularly use wood as a nesting substratum.
Social and ecological contexts of trophallaxis in facultatively social sweat bees, Megalopta genalis and M. ecuadoria (Hymenoptera, Halictidae)
TLDR
The occurrence of trophallaxis in a species with mass-provisioned larvae provides an opportunity to examine the ritualization of social behavior, and increases survivorship of males and females by almost 50% under experimental conditions, suggesting the behavior is also important in ecological contexts.
...
...