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Sex, age and ovarian activity affect cuticular hydrocarbons in Diacamma ceylonense, a queenless ant.
TLDR
Variations in cuticular profile are a reliable reflection of ovarian activity, and could be used by ants as a fertility signal, and are discussed in the context of physiological models of the relation between ovarian activity and the synthesis of cuticular hydrocarbons. Expand
Fertility signalling and reproductive skew in queenless ants
TLDR
The fertility signal in queenless ants is compared with the ‘badge of status’ reported in various birds and the evolutionary stability of this communication system is discussed and given special emphasis to ecological constraints and the high degree of intracolonial relatedness typical of social insects. Expand
Microbial Challenge Promotes the Regenerative Process of the Injured Central Nervous System of the Medicinal Leech by Inducing the Synthesis of Antimicrobial Peptides in Neurons and Microglia12
TLDR
The leech CNS appears as an excellent model for studying the implication of immune molecules in neural repair after trauma, and is the first to report the neuronal synthesis of antimicrobial peptides and their participation in the immune response and the regeneration of the CNS. Expand
Reproductive monopoly enforced by sterile police workers in a queenless ant
TLDR
This is the first study that uncouples dominance and fertility in a social insect: it gives a better understanding of the crucial role of sterile helpers in the control of reproductive skew in animal societies. Expand
Regulation of reproduction in a queenless ant: aggression, pheromones and reduction in conflict
TLDR
A demonstration of a shift from physical inhibition to chemical signalling is interpreted in terms of sociogenetic theory, the role of cuticular hydrocarbons as an indicator of fertility in insects and the fact that the regulation of reproduction in Diacamma involves mechanisms redolent of both queenless and queenright ant species. Expand
Deciphering the Immune Function and Regulation by a TLR of the Cytokine EMAPII in the Lesioned Central Nervous System Using a Leech Model12
TLDR
This is the first report showing evidence for the chemoattractant properties of EMAPII on leech and human microglial cells, the regulation by a TLR of the expression of a gene encoding a cytokine in the CNS of an invertebrate, and an immune function of aTLR in a lophotrochozoan model. Expand
Rapid modification in the olfactory signal of ants following a change in reproductive status
TLDR
It is demonstrated that a dominant’s olfactory signal changes rapidly with a modification in her social status, and it occurs well before the onset of egg-laying, suggesting that police workers select the dominant worker with the “less fertile” odour. Expand
Biogenic amine levels, reproduction and social dominance in the queenless ant Streblognathus peetersi
TLDR
Investigation of the neurochemistry of the queenless ant species, Streblognathus peetersi, finds similarity to honey bees may either confirm the heritage of queenless species from their probably highly eusocial ancestors or highlight independent patterns of biogenic amine influences on the social organisation of these highly derived species. Expand
Characterization and immune function of two intracellular sensors, HmTLR1 and HmNLR, in the injured CNS of an invertebrate.
TLDR
This work constitutes the first demonstration in an invertebrate of an intracellular TLR and a cytosolic PRR related to the NLR family, and both receptors show patterns of induction upon stimulation that suggest their involvement in the leech neuroimmune response. Expand
Honey bee (Apis mellifera) transferrin-gene structure and the role of ecdysteroids in the developmental regulation of its expression.
TLDR
The negative regulation of AmTRF by ecdysteroids deduced from the developmental expression profile was confirmed by experimental treatment of spinning-stage honey bee larvae with 20-hydroxyecdysone, and of fourth instar-larvae with juvenile hormone. Expand
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