Uwe Deppenmeier

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Archaebacterial halophiles (Haloarchaea) are oxygen-respiring heterotrophs that derive from methanogens--strictly anaerobic, hydrogen-dependent autotrophs. Haloarchaeal genomes are known to have acquired, via lateral gene transfer (LGT), several genes from eubacteria, but it is yet unknown how many genes the Haloarchaea acquired in total and, more(More)
Gluconobacter oxydans is unsurpassed by other organisms in its ability to incompletely oxidize a great variety of carbohydrates, alcohols and related compounds. Furthermore, the organism is used for several biotechnological processes, such as vitamin C production. To further our understanding of its overall metabolism, we sequenced the complete genome of G.(More)
The Archaeon Methanosarcina mazei and related species are of great ecological importance as they are the only organisms fermenting acetate, methylamines and methanol to methane, carbon dioxide and ammonia (in case of methylamines). Since acetate is the precursor of 60% of the methane produced on earth these organisms contribute significantly to the(More)
Methane-forming archaea are strictly anaerobic microbes and are essential for global carbon fluxes since they perform the terminal step in breakdown of organic matter in the absence of oxygen. Major part of methane produced in nature derives from the methyl group of acetate. Only members of the genera Methanosarcina and Methanosaeta are able to use this(More)
Methanogenic archaea are strictly anaerobic organisms that derive their metabolic energy from the conversion of a restricted number of substrates to methane. H2+CO2 and formate are converted to CH4 via the CO2-reducing pathway, while methanol and methylamines are metabolized by the methylotrophic pathway. A limited number of methanogenic organisms utilize(More)
A hydrophobic, redox-active component with a molecular mass of 538 Da was isolated from lyophilized membranes of Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 by extraction with isooctane. After purification on a high-performance liquid chromatography column, the chemical structure was analyzed by mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance studies. The component was(More)
Methanogenic archaea of the genus Methanosarcina are able to utilize H2 + CO2, methylated C1 compounds or acetate as energy and carbon source, thereby producing methane as the major end product. The methanogenic pathways lead to the formation of a mixed disulfide derived from coenzyme M and coenzyme B. This disulfide is of major importance for methanogens(More)
Methanogenic archaea have an unusual type of metabolism because they use H2 + CO2, formate, methylated C1 compounds, or acetate as energy and carbon sources for growth. The methanogens produce methane as the major end product of their metabolism in a unique energy-generating process. The organisms received much attention because they catalyze the terminal(More)
Members of the genus Methanosarcina are strictly anaerobic archaea that derive their metabolic energy from the conversion of a restricted number of substrates to methane. H2 + CO2 are converted to CH4 via the CO2-reducing pathway, while methanol and methylamines are metabolized by the methylotrophic pathway. Two novel electron transport systems are involved(More)
Certain archaeal species can fix molecular nitrogen under nitrogen limiting conditions although little is known about this process at either the genetic or molecular level. To address this on a genome-wide scale, transcriptional analysis was performed on the model methanogen Methanosarcina mazei strain Gö1 using DNA-microarrays. The genomic expression(More)