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Tight control of translation is fundamental for eukaryotic cells, and deregulation of proteins implicated contributes to numerous human diseases. The neurodegenerative disorder spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 is caused by a trinucleotide expansion in the SCA2 gene encoding a lengthened polyglutamine stretch in the gene product ataxin-2, which seems to be(More)
Paralogs for several proteins implicated in neurodegenerative disorders have been identified and explored to further facilitate the identification of molecular mechanisms contributing to disease pathogenesis. For the disease-causing protein in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2, ataxin-2, a paralog of unknown function, termed ataxin-2-like, has been described.(More)
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is a hereditary neurodegenerative disorder caused by a trinucleotide expansion in the SCA2 gene, encoding a polyglutamine stretch in the gene product ataxin-2 (ATX2), whose cellular function is unknown. However, ATX2 interacts with A2BP1, a protein containing an RNA-recognition motif, and the existence of an interaction(More)
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder that is caused by an expanded trinucleotide repeat in the SCA2 gene, encoding a polyglutamine stretch in the gene product ataxin-2. Although evidence has been provided that ataxin-2 is involved in RNA metabolism, the physiological function of ataxin-2 remains unclear. Here, we(More)
Gene transcription is controlled by transcriptional regulators acting with specific co-regulators to allow gene activation and repression. Here, we report the identification of the KRAB-containing zinc-finger transcriptional regulator, ZBRK1, as an interaction partner of the SCA2 gene product ataxin-2. Furthermore, we discovered that an elevated ZBRK1 level(More)
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