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The Evolution of Cooperation
Darwin recognized that natural selection could not favor a trait in one species solely for the benefit of another species. The modern, selfish‐gene view of the world suggests that cooperation betweenExpand
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The agricultural pathology of ant fungus gardens.
Gardens of fungus-growing ants (Formicidae: Attini) traditionally have been thought to be free of microbial parasites, with the fungal mutualist maintained in nearly pure "monocultures." We conductedExpand
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Ancient Tripartite Coevolution in the Attine Ant-Microbe Symbiosis
The symbiosis between fungus-growing ants and the fungi they cultivate for food has been shaped by 50 million years of coevolution. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that this long coevolutionaryExpand
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The Evolution of Agriculture in Insects
▪ Abstract Agriculture has evolved independently in three insect orders: once in ants, once in termites, and seven times in ambrosia beetles. Although these insect farmers are in some ways quiteExpand
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Evolutionary History of the Symbiosis Between Fungus-Growing Ants and Their Fungi
The evolutionary history of the symbiosis between fungus-growing ants (Attini) and their fungi was elucidated by comparing phylogenies of both symbionts. The fungal phylogeny based on cladisticExpand
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Inclusive fitness theory and eusociality
Arising from M. A. Nowak, C. E. Tarnita & E. O. Wilson 466, 1057–1062 (2010)10.1038/nature09205; Nowak et al. replyNowak et al. argue that inclusive fitness theory has been of little value inExpand
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The Origin of the Attine Ant-Fungus Mutualism
Cultivation of fungus for food originated about 45-65 million years ago in the ancestor of fungus-growing ants (Formicidae, tribe Attini), representing an evolutionary transition from the life of aExpand
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Ant versus Fungus versus Mutualism: Ant‐Cultivar Conflict and the Deconstruction of the Attine Ant‐Fungus Symbiosis
  • U. Mueller
  • Biology, Medicine
  • The American Naturalist
  • 1 October 2002
A century of research on fungus‐growing ants (Attini, Formicidae) has ignored the cultivated fungi as passive domesticates and viewed the attine fungicultural symbiosis as an integrated unitExpand
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Generalized antifungal activity and 454-screening of Pseudonocardia and Amycolatopsis bacteria in nests of fungus-growing ants
In many host-microbe mutualisms, hosts use beneficial metabolites supplied by microbial symbionts. Fungus-growing (attine) ants are thought to form such a mutualism with Pseudonocardia bacteria toExpand
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Coevolution between Attine Ants and Actinomycete Bacteria: A Reevaluation
Abstract We reassess the coevolution between actinomycete bacteria and fungus-gardening (attine) ants. Actinomycete bacteria are of special interest because they are metabolic mutualists of diverseExpand
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