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Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is an autosomal recessive disorder defined clinically by severe gastrointestinal dysmotility; cachexia; ptosis, ophthalmoparesis, or both; peripheral neuropathy; leukoencephalopathy; and mitochondrial abnormalities. The disease is caused by mutations in the thymidine phosphorylase (TP) gene. TP(More)
We report five patients with mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) who had demyelinating peripheral neuropathy. The MNGIE neuropathy had clinical and electrodiagnostic features typical of acquired, rather than inherited, etiologies. In fact, three patients were actually treated for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy(More)
BACKGROUND The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome (MDS) is an autosomal recessive disorder of early childhood characterized by decreased mtDNA copy number in affected tissues. Recently, MDS has been linked to mutations in two genes involved in deoxyribonucleotide (dNTP) metabolism: thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) and deoxy-guanosine kinase (dGK).(More)
Scapuloperoneal (SP) syndrome encompasses heterogeneous neuromuscular disorders characterized by weakness in the shoulder-girdle and peroneal muscles. In a large Italian-American pedigree with dominant SP myopathy (SPM) previously linked to chromosome 12q, we have mapped the disease to Xq26, and, in all of the affected individuals, we identified a missense(More)
Genetic defects affecting the mitochondrial respiratory chain comprise an important cause of encephalomyopathies. Considering the structural complexity of the respiratory chain, its dual genetic control, and the numerous nuclear genes required for proper assembly of the enzyme complexes, the phenotypic heterogeneity is not surprising. From a(More)
Navajo neurohepatopathy (NNH) is an autosomal recessive disease that is prevalent among Navajo children in the southwestern United States. The major clinical features are hepatopathy, peripheral neuropathy, corneal anesthesia and scarring, acral mutilation, cerebral leukoencephalopathy, failure to thrive, and recurrent metabolic acidosis with intercurrent(More)
Navajo neurohepatopathy (NNH) is an autosomal recessive disease of full-blooded Navajo children living in the Navajo Reservation of southwestern United States. Clinical features of NNH include peripheral and central nervous system involvement, acral mutilation, corneal scarring or ulceration, liver failure, and metabolic and immunologic derangement. The(More)
Constituents of the Cannabis plant, cannabinoids, may be of therapeutic value in neurologic diseases. The most abundant cannabinoids are Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, which possesses psychoactive properties, and cannabidiol, which has no intrinsic psychoactive effects, but exhibits neuroprotective properties in preclinical studies. A small number of(More)
Inclusion body myositis, a chronic inflammatory disorder, is the most common cause of myopathy in adults over the age of 50. Diagnosis is based on clinical features and distinctive morphological findings by both light and electron microscopy. The causes of inclusion body myositis are still unknown. Ultrastructural mitochondrial changes and ragged-red fibers(More)
A patient with a severe progressive neuromuscular disorder resembling spinal muscular atrophy is reported. The initial muscle biopsy was consistent with a denervating process. DNA analysis did not reveal deletions in exons 7 and 8 of the survival motor neuron gene. Histology, histochemistry, and biochemistry of a second muscle biopsy suggested mitochondrial(More)