Trinad Chakraborty

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Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen with a high mortality rate that has also emerged as a paradigm for intracellular parasitism. We present and compare the genome sequences of L. monocytogenes (2,944,528 base pairs) and a nonpathogenic species, L. innocua (3,011,209 base pairs). We found a large number of predicted genes encoding surface and(More)
The gram-positive bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of listeriosis, a highly fatal opportunistic foodborne infection. Pregnant women, neonates, the elderly, and debilitated or immunocompromised patients in general are predominantly affected, although the disease can also develop in normal individuals. Clinical manifestations of(More)
The ActA protein of the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes induces a dramatic reorganization of the actin-based cytoskeleton. Two profilin binding proteins, VASP and Mena, are the only cellular proteins known so far to bind directly to ActA. This interaction is mediated by a conserved module, the EVH1 domain. We identify E/DFPPPPXD/E, a motif(More)
The surface-bound ActA polypeptide of the intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is the sole listerial factor needed for recruitment of host actin filaments by intracellularly motile bacteria. Here we report that following Listeria infection the host vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP), a microfilament- and focal(More)
In addition to their bridging function between innate and adaptive immunity, dendritic cells (DCs) may also contribute to primary resistance against infection. Here we analyzed the role of DCs during infection with Listeria monocytogenes by performing systemic in vivo depletion of these cells. We showed that CD8alpha(+) DCs were crucial for L. monocytogenes(More)
Listeria monocytogenes is a gram-positive, food-borne microorganism responsible for invasive infections with a high overall mortality. L. monocytogenes is among the very few microorganisms that can induce uptake into the host cell and subsequently enter the host cell cytosol by breaching the vacuolar membrane. We infected the murine macrophage cell line(More)
Autophagy degrades unnecessary organelles and misfolded protein aggregates, as well as cytoplasm-invading bacteria. Nevertheless, the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes efficiently escapes autophagy. We show here that recruitment of the Arp2/3 complex and Ena/VASP, via the bacterial ActA protein, to the bacterial surface disguises the bacteria from autophagic(More)
The ability of Listeria monocytogenes to move within the cytosol of infected cells and their ability to infect adjacent cells is important in the development of infection foci leading to systemic disease. Interaction with the host cell microfilament system, particularly actin, appears to be the basis for propelling the bacteria through the host cell(More)
Internalization of Listeria monocytogenes into nonphagocytic cell lines in vitro requires the products of the inlAB locus (J.-L. Gaillard, P. Berche, C. Frehel, E. Gouin, and P. Cossart, Cell 65:1127-1141, 1991). By generating isogenic mutants with a chromosomal in-frame deletion in either inlA or inlB, we have identified InlA and InlB as surface-bound(More)
Listeria monocytogenes, a food-borne bacterial pathogen, enters mammalian cells by inducing its own phagocytosis. The listerial protein internalin (InlA) mediates bacterial adhesion and invasion of epithelial cells in the human intestine through specific interaction with its host cell receptor E-cadherin. We present the crystal structures of the functional(More)