Torsten Falk

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An endogenous inward-rectifying K+ current is described, which is present in native oocytes of some Xenopus laevis donors. Experiments were performed using defolliculated oocytes from donor frogs obtained from two different suppliers. In all oocytes from animals from one source, an inward-rectifying K+ current could be elicited with negative pulses from a(More)
Neurons maintained in dispersed primary culture offer a number of advantages as a model system and are particularly well-suited for studies of the intrinsic electrical properties of neurons by patch clamp. We have characterized the immunocytochemical and electrophysiological properties of cultured rat striatal neurons as they develop in vitro in order to(More)
Parkinson's disease (PD) results from the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and the consequent deficit of dopamine released in the striatum. Current oral dopamine replacement or surgical therapies do not address the underlying issue of neurodegeneration, they neither slow nor halt disease. Neurotrophic factors have shown(More)
Human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells have been tested as a cell-based therapy for Parkinson's disease but will require additional study before further clinical trials can be planned. We now show that the long-term survival and neurotrophic potential of hRPE cells can be enhanced by the use of FDA-approved plastic-based microcarriers compared to a(More)
Transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in the basal ganglia could provide a novel cell-based therapy for Parkinson's disease by providing a constant source of dopamine replacement via the melanin synthetic pathway enzyme tyrosinase. We now demonstrate that human RPE cells also produce a neurotrophic effect on primary cultures of rat(More)
Vascular endothelial growth factor B (VEGF-B) has recently been shown to be a promising novel neuroprotective agent for several neurodegenerative conditions. In the current study we extended previous work on neuroprotective potential for Parkinson's disease (PD) by testing an expanded dose range of VEGF-B (1 and 10 μg) and directly comparing both(More)
The rapidly inactivating A-type K+ current (IA) is prominent in hippocampal neurons; and the speed of its inactivation may regulate electrical excitability. The auxiliary K+ channel subunit Kvbeta 1.1 confers fast inactivation to Shaker-related channels and is postulated to affect IA. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings of rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons in(More)
Over the last few decades, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) have emerged as multifaceted players in not only the pathogenesis, but potential treatment, of numerous diseases. They activate diverse intracellular signaling cascades known to have extensive crosstalk, and have been best studied for their(More)
Developing novel neuroprotective strategies for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) is of great importance. We have previously shown that vascular endothelial growth factor-B (VEGF-B) is up-regulated in an in vitro model of PD using the neurotoxin rotenone. Addition of exogenous VEGF-B(167) was neuroprotective in this same model, suggesting that(More)
Transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in the basal ganglia has been proposed as a novel cell-based therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD), by providing a constant source of dopamine replacement via the melanin synthetic pathway enzyme tyrosinase. We have demonstrated previously that human RPE cells also produce a neurotrophic effect on(More)