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It is widely believed that human malaria parasites infect only man as a natural host. However, earlier morphological observations suggest that great apes are likely to be natural reservoirs as well. To identify malaria parasites in great apes, we screened 60 chimpanzees imported into Japan. Using the sequences of small subunit rRNA and the mitochondrial(More)
In the brain, enormous numbers of neurons have functional individuality and distinct circuit specificities. Clustered Protocadherins (Pcdhs), diversified cell-surface proteins, are stochastically expressed by alternative promoter choice and affect dendritic arborization in individual neurons. Here we found that the Pcdh promoters are differentially(More)
Drug resistance compromises control of malaria. Here, we show that resistance to a commonly used antimalarial medication, atovaquone, is apparently unable to spread. Atovaquone pressure selects parasites with mutations in cytochrome b, a respiratory protein with low but essential activity in the mammalian blood phase of the parasite life cycle. Resistance(More)
We report habenular lateralization in a simple transgenic mouse model used for labeling a facet of neuronal activity history. A transgenic construct comprised of a zif268/egr1 immediate-early gene promoter and a gene for normal Venus fluorescent protein with a membrane tag converted promoter activity into long-life fluorescent proteins, which was thought to(More)
Malaria remains as one of the most devastating infectious disease, and continues to exact an enormous toll in medical cost and days of labor lost especially in the tropics. Effective malaria control and eventual eradication remain a huge challenge, with efficacious antimalarials as important intervention/management tool. Clearly new alternative drugs that(More)
We generated transgenic mice lines with a construct consisting of the zif268/egr1 promoter and the gene for the normal long-life yellow fluorescent protein (Venus) with a membrane localization sequence. One of the lines exhibited topographic labeling in the medial habenular nucleus (MHb) during postnatal development, which confirmed the previous findings(More)
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