Tommaso Lorenzi

Learn More
Resistance to chemotherapies, particularly to anticancer treatments, is an increasing medical concern. Among the many mechanisms at work in cancers, one of the most important is the selection of tumor cells expressing resistance genes or phenotypes. Motivated by the theory of mutation-selection in adaptive evolution, we propose a model based on a continuous(More)
Animal groups in nature often display an enhanced collective information-processing capacity. It has been speculated that natural selection will tune this response to be optimal, ensuring that the group is reactive while also being robust to noise. Here, we show that this is unlikely to be the case. By using a simple model of decision-making in a dynamic(More)
In recent experiments on isogenetic cancer cell lines, it was observed that exposure to high doses of anticancer drugs can induce the emergence of a subpopulation of weakly proliferative and drug-tolerant cells, which display markers associated with stem cell-like cancer cells. After a period of time, some of the surviving cells were observed to change(More)
Histopathological evidence supports the idea that the emergence of phenotypic heterogeneity and resistance to cytotoxic drugs can be considered as a process of adaptation, or evolution, in tumor cell populations. In this framework, can we explain intra-tumor heterogeneity in terms of cell adaptation to local conditions? How do anti-cancer therapies affect(More)
This paper deals with the development of a mathematical model for the in vitro dynamics of malignant hepatocytes exposed to anti-cancer therapies. The model consists of a set of integro-differential equations describing the dynamics of tumor cells under the effects of mutation and competition phenomena, interactions with cytokines regulating cell(More)
An enduring puzzle in evolutionary biology is to understand how individuals and populations adapt to fluctuating environments. Here we present an integro-differential model of adaptive dynamics in a phenotype-structured population whose fitness landscape evolves in time due to periodic environmental oscillations. The analytical tractability of our model(More)
BACKGROUND Drug-induced drug resistance in cancer has been attributed to diverse biological mechanisms at the individual cell or cell population scale, relying on stochastically or epigenetically varying expression of phenotypes at the single cell level, and on the adaptability of tumours at the cell population level. SCOPE OF REVIEW We focus on(More)
Histopathological evidence supports the idea that the emergence of phenotypic heterogeneity and resistance to cytotoxic drugs can be considered as a process of selection in tumor cell populations. In this framework, can we explain intra-tumor heterogeneity in terms of selection driven by the local cell environment? Can we overcome the emergence of(More)
This paper deals with the development of a mathematical model that describes cancer dynamics at the cellular scale. The selected case study concerns colon and rectum cancer, which originates in colorectal crypts. Cells inside the crypts are assumed to be organized according to a compartmental-like arrangement and to be homogeneously mixing. A mathematical(More)